sweetchef Posted 26 Apr 2006 , 6:26am
post #1 of

I'm considering purchasing a dough sheeter/roller for my bakery (to roll cut-out cookies, pie crusts, and fondant). I would appreciate any advice from someone who owns one. There are so many different types!

23 replies
sugartopped Posted 26 Apr 2006 , 3:11pm
post #2 of

can't give advice about any specific ones...but I'd like to know also...this would be awesome!!

lcdmarie Posted 27 Apr 2006 , 1:47am
post #3 of

I am interested too

PieceofCakeAZ Posted 28 Apr 2006 , 7:51am
post #4 of

I have the Somerset CDR500.

Here is a link to the details: http://www.smrset.com/CDR-500.html

It's nice most of the time but there is more sticking to the rollers than I would like. If the fondant is too moist, it's stick city, if it is too dry, it's not going to look great on the cake. It takes a while to get it just right but once you do the sheeter is a huge help. They are a bit pricey (I got mine used for $2000) but if you do quite a few fondant covered wedding cakes, it will actually pay for itself... and I mean really.. it will pay for itself. I have found that we use about 1/2 of the fondant that we used prior to getting the sheeter. We can now get it to a perfect 1/8" thick all the way around and I swear when we were handrolling it sometimes there were parts that were 1/2" thick while another part was 1/4" thick.

It saves a lot of time and definitely cuts back on the cost of fondant. It can roll out super thin for ribbons & bows or pretty thick for things like cookie dough.

I am definitely glad we took the plunge and picked it up!

sweetchef Posted 28 Apr 2006 , 5:59pm
post #5 of

I'm used to working in hotels where we had the HUGE sheeter with a flat canvas belt extending from both sides. The dough just moves horizontal through one way, then the other--it's very gentle on the food. Once you get used to using one, you'll never want to go back to hand rolling! But, now that I have a VERY small bakery, I don't have that kind of room OR budget!

I'm worried that the "double pass" models with just a tray may not work for something sticky and un-elastic like cookie dough (I make ALOT of decorated cut-out cookies) because the dough moves in an S-shape instead of just lying flat and moving back and forth.

They also make models with a flat belt out of just one side, maybe that's a good compromise.

PIECE OF CAKE: You have a "double pass" model, do you think it's gentle enough for sugar cookie dough? For fondant: Do you just feed it through once, or make a few passes to get it that thin?

PieceofCakeAZ Posted 29 Apr 2006 , 7:22am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetchef


PIECE OF CAKE: You have a "double pass" model, do you think it's gentle enough for sugar cookie dough? For fondant: Do you just feed it through once, or make a few passes to get it that thin?




It is a single pass. Usually we feed it through a couple of times to get it that thin. If we try it all at once, the fondant tends to get stuck. icon_sad.gif

tansaliba Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:47am
post #7 of

AHi was wondering if anyone can help me please I want to buy a somerset sheeter I'm from Australia..does anyone where I can go?

Smckinney07 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:04am
post #8 of

A

Original message sent by sweetchef

I'm used to working in hotels where we had the HUGE sheeter with a flat canvas belt extending from both sides. The dough just moves horizontal through one way, then the other--it's very gentle on the food. Once you get used to using one, you'll never want to go back to hand rolling! But, now that I have a VERY small bakery, I don't have that kind of room OR budget!

I'm worried that the "double pass" models with just a tray may not work for something sticky and un-elastic like cookie dough (I make ALOT of decorated cut-out cookies) because the dough moves in an S-shape instead of just lying flat and moving back and forth.

They also make models with a flat belt out of just one side, maybe that's a good compromise.

PIECE OF CAKE: You have a "double pass" model, do you think it's gentle enough for sugar cookie dough? For fondant: Do you just feed it through once, or make a few passes to get it that thin?

I've been thinking about getting one also, but I don't do many cookies so it would just be for fondant. I've never had the pleasure of using anything without a hand crank (which I often have to roll through a time or two obviously for smaller pieces). The one you were referring to from your old job was a 'double pass' model? I wouldn't have room for something that huge but I wonder if they'd make a smaller model. The way you describe it, it needs the length to run both ways though?

I've looked a bit online but most of my equipment is used.

disastrophe Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 1:40am
post #9 of

I did an internship at a bakery that swore by Rondo sheeters.  If you go to the bread baking forum, The Fresh Loaf, members there who do laminated dough also swear by them.  Rondo makes reversible sheeters like the one sweetchef mentions.  They make tabletop versions of them, but the ones I've seen, even used, are quite pricey. 
 

teri5 Posted 9 Jun 2014 , 2:38pm

ADoes anyone use this: http://www.baileypottery.com/slabrollers/drd2.htm For rolling cookie dough? I'd appreciate any feedback.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Jun 2014 , 5:53pm

under the category of 'any feedback'-- for one i have seen a similar rolly thing for food on ebay but you have to pick up the fondant and feed it back in -- if i understood it correctly it only went one way -- not back & forth --does this one go back & forth? it seems to--

 

and i would wonder about the food safeness of this one--food safe  means it needs the nsf labeling on it (if you are in the states)

 

but all that said i love it-- i love equipment like that -- maybe not for food but.. still it's cool

-K8memphis Posted 9 Jun 2014 , 6:05pm

this one is no longer for sale but just interesting to know they are out there somewhere-- if this link works for you then scroll down when you get there to see it

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/16-Inches-Dough-Sheeter-Pasta-Roller-Pizza-maker-16-034-/161281008211?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2047675.l2557&nma=true&si=sUgdBUVfTlwtpjw4wvA3%252F5NUdqg%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc

 

it's only $359 but again you gotta lift it up and refeed it in but if you got the right set up it could work.. if you can find one...

CindiM Posted 9 Jun 2014 , 7:02pm

Why I bought a sheeter. 

 

I am a little over 5 foot tall and would be worn out, after rolling out the fondant and it would be dried out by the time, I got it rolled out to the right size.  

 

I've had the CDR600 Somerset 30 inch, for 9 or 10 years?  I bought it brand new and it was so worth it!!!! 

I had to cover 13 tiers last weekend and it was a breeze. 

 

I love my sheeter!  It works perfectly.  It saves me fondant, time and money!

tansaliba Posted 10 Jun 2014 , 9:22pm

AThanks so muchCindiM can u tell me what's the biggest cake you can make with it? Also do u put corn flour on it so it dosnt stuck :)

tansaliba Posted 10 Jun 2014 , 9:23pm

ASorry stick. Also can u colour the fondant before putting it through the machine or does it become sticky?

CindiM Posted 10 Jun 2014 , 10:58pm

Hi tansalba

 

Okay, I will start with the biggest size cake question, about my 30 inch Somerset sheeter. 

I normally make 12 x 18 inch sheet cakes for bridal shows and it is way easier. 

My biggest wedding cake tier was my special 18 inch square cake.  That 18 inch square was fun!!  I had to have my husband help me take it over to the cake and whip it on, like a blanket on a bed. 

 

Next, do I use cornstarch?  I don't have to, I run my fondant through my sheeter on a silicone sheet.  It is perfect.  The fondant doesn't tear, stretch or dry out!!!

 

Last question, coloring, I run all of my fondant (Satin Ice) through the sheeter, after I knead it.  And it doesn't matter if it has color added to it.  I had to make a dark Magenta Pink color last weekend and I used a combination of powdered color, gel and liquid to get the matching shade.  I use shortning on my hands for kneading and I don't really get the fondant that sticky, that may mean the color isn't blended well in the fondant. 

I know I should wear plastic gloves, but my pink hands looked pretty cool.

 

Please let me know if you have any other questions!!!!! 

tansaliba Posted 11 Jun 2014 , 9:32pm

AThank u so so much for your help its a little hard to find out info as I'm in Australia and there is no one. Here that sells the machine so I guess I will have to buy direct from sommerset in USA themselves. Thanks again Tanya :)

CindiM Posted 11 Jun 2014 , 10:34pm

You are very welcome, Tanya. 

Somerset may have a dealer on your side of the globe.  Best of luck, Cindim

SweetnessBakeshop Posted 25 Jun 2014 , 1:18am

We have a 30" Somerset, I can honestly say it was worth every penny. To avoid it sticking to the rollers we actually roll it out on one of those silicone mats, works like a charm.

tansaliba Posted 25 Jun 2014 , 9:24pm

ASo u feed it through with the silicone mat sweetness bake shop? Are u in Australia or USA? I can not find anyone here in Australia that sells them

SweetnessBakeshop Posted 28 Jun 2014 , 6:52pm

Yes, we feed it through with a silicone mat, which is the technique taught by Julie Bashore in her Satin Ice classes, here is a video so you have a better understanding. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLqcB9luBcI

 

If I need something really small, like to cut out a plaque, or fondant cutouts, i use either a smaller mat, or no mat at all - but when I need a big piece to drape a cake I use the silicone mat - I much rather this than have to drench my fondant in cornstarch or anything like that.

 

I'm not sure on Somersets availability in Australia via a Distributor, I purchased mine directly from Somerset - I'm sure if you call them they will point you in the right direction, or even sell to you directly, shipping might be a bit pricey, but the time and money you'll save in not rolling fondant is worthwhile. To give you an idea, we have the 30" which is the largest model and it cost us around $5,000 (US Dollars) + Freight

 

I should also mention, that although you can use this sheeter for dough, I prefer not to, just because it becomes a bit messy and you have to break it down and clean it before using it again for fondant, however, the times I have used it for pie dough or cookies, I put the dough in between two sheets of parchment paper and it keeps the mess minimal.

granny ann Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 1:58pm

Just bought this roller from Bailey and hope it works well for pizza dough and pie crust! Looks like an awesome deal. I was told lots of bakers use them; has anyone here tried it?

tansaliba Posted 2 Jul 2014 , 11:20pm

AThank you so so much sweetness bake shop, that video is excellent I love seeing videos, but I don't know how to find them as it dosnt say cake in half of the titles. I am going to get onto sommerset direct, thank you once again for your help advice and video.

BarbVanHorn Posted 15 Jan 2015 , 7:10pm

Shopping for a roller myself.  How is the Bailey working for you?

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