Anyone Ever Get Busted?

Business By lhayes1976 Updated 7 May 2007 , 12:38am by khoudek

MamaBerry Posted 16 Apr 2007 , 4:54am
post #31 of 63

You know, this entire thread just made me decide to get off my lazy bum and change my old info (business name, etc.) from my other business that existed a lifetime ago to my new business.

I'm calling up Jersey tomorrow and paying the money to switch the name over.

Thanks for sharing such darn good advice.

CakesbyMonica Posted 2 May 2007 , 12:24am
post #32 of 63

If that had been my cake I woulda decked the woman, inspector or not. icon_smile.gif

albumangel Posted 2 May 2007 , 12:47am
post #33 of 63

A friend-of-a-friend ran a catering business from home- just had her kitchen remodelled for it- but wasn't licensed. Mostly did jobs for close friends, neighbors & family. Didn't advertise except thru word-of-mouth. One day the health inspector walked in and poured bleach over ALL of the food in her kitchen- pantry, fridge, etc, to shut her down.

That one story was enough to scare me into doing lots of homework and getting legal as soon as possible, before I make even one cake for profit. The way I see it, I'll be making a commitment to the business and making myself accountable by investing that money and time. That can never hurt!

I just can't imagine ruining an entire wedding cake... that must have been AWFUL!!

mkerton Posted 2 May 2007 , 12:48am
post #34 of 63

I really wish that there were reasonable ways for us home bakers to be legal...in my state, you must have a seperate kitchen (with no access from the inside of your home--ie it can be attached to your house but you must leave your home and walk in from an outside entrance)...your home must be zoned for commercial businesses (or allowed to operate from your homeowners assoc if applicable)...3 or 4 sinks (I forget which) etc etc.... so its IMPOSSIBLE for me to do it out of my home....and it doesnt make any sense for me to rent space when all I WANT to do is cakes for my family and close friends...but I have such a hard time saying no when someone loves my cakes (cause a family member showed them)......that said I often lose money on those deals.......when my family wants to tell everyone they know about me, I always tell them no....I am not legal nor can I be if I want (my most important job is raising my son).........sometimes it seems ironic to me, its easier for me to be legal watching someone elses kids....than it is for me to make a darn cake (and I feed the kids too)........go figure!

indydebi Posted 2 May 2007 , 3:28am
post #35 of 63

[quote="mypastrychef"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by marthajo1

....She said if she catches someone setting up a wedding cake without a license she will pour bleach all over the wedding cake and too bad on the bride. mpc




So she isn't destroying the food because it's contaminated .... she's destroying the food because the paperwork wasn't done. If someone is setting up a wedding cake, she doens't know the kitchen conditions so she doesn't know if the cake is contaminated or not. I understand that it could be argued that if the baker is not a licensed baker, then the food shouldn't be served ..... that doesn't appear to be the same thing as "this food is not fit for human consumption! It's contaminated and must be destroyed!" I don't see how she can know that at the point of assembly.

I agree with the other post .... sounds like an inspector who is on a power trip and out of control.

snarkybaker Posted 2 May 2007 , 3:40am
post #36 of 63
Quote:
Quote:


She also told us she recently destroyed $21,000 worth of meats at the Isle of Capri Casino because they were outside barbeque-ing without an
outside food certificate. And that was the mafia! Surprised




Sounds to me like a health inspector that's looking for a pair of cement shoes icon_surprised.gif

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 2 May 2007 , 3:48am
post #37 of 63

icon_eek.gificon_mad.gificon_eek.gif

Health inspector or not...if someone comes into my kitchen and destroys my property...the cops and a judge will be involved!

Those stories are insane! Pouring bleach on food?? icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif $21k worth of meat? They could have simply moved the meat inside and cooked it! And the wedding cake? How could an inspector prove, on site, that it came from a kitchen that wasn't licensed?

I'm going to bed....

khoudek Posted 2 May 2007 , 3:54am
post #38 of 63

What I find interesting about the inspector pouring the bleach is that bleach is considered a hazardous material in hospitals and other work places that use it. When we had a bleach spill in the hospital, we had special procedures in place for it's clean up due to its toxic fumes. I think it's weird that the health dept. would condone spilling bleach on everything and exposing people to possible skin and inhalation chemical burns.

msauer Posted 2 May 2007 , 3:58am
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked

That's my only issue with home bakers - I worry about someone losing their home, etc. Where will you bake from then?!? icon_wink.gif





I agree...I am a home baker and also invested in forming an LLC (Limited Liability Corporation) for $125 so that my 1/2 of our home/property/assests don't get a lien placed on them should something go wrong...now where is that wood?!? LOL!!!

The more protection the better!!! (Not to mention I used to work in a law firm and have three BIL's and one SIL who are attorneys who rode me hard till I got "protection") icon_wink.gif

CarolAnn Posted 2 May 2007 , 4:14am
post #40 of 63

Can you imagine the property damage caused by an inspector pouring bleach on food or cakes at a venue? Whether it's inside our out. We're talking churches, banquet halls, Hotels lawns/gardens, etc etc. Geez, I've never heard of such a thing. Do they have maniacs out there doing these pop in inspections? They must be watching the wedding/special occassion announcements in the papers to find these things. This is awful!

tonyah Posted 2 May 2007 , 4:38pm
post #41 of 63

As an inspector in Alabama I have never poured bleach on any product except what was condemned and in a dumpster. I only did it then to keep the general public from removing it and consuming it (it was chicken). You also are supposed (at least here) to do a legal order condemning the food - that way the people can file with their insurance and be reimbursed.

In my county we issue a cease and desist order and if you continue to operate we give you one more chance to close and then a warrant is issued. Very rarely do we end up in court. Also it's not just bakers - it's mini mart owners that throw hot dog cookers up, the guy smoking butts, illegal restaurants... the list is long.

indydebi Posted 2 May 2007 , 4:50pm
post #42 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

Can you imagine the property damage caused by an inspector pouring bleach on food or cakes at a venue? Whether it's inside our out. We're talking churches, banquet halls, Hotels lawns/gardens, etc etc. ....




I never even thought of that....bleach pouring down over their (colored?) linens, carpets, plants in the gardens?

marthajo1 Posted 2 May 2007 , 5:02pm
post #43 of 63

I have been researching this bleach pouring stuff. Cause I jsut can't believe it! It sounds to urban legend scary hoax email-ish to me! I have several inquiries in to hoax buster sites. I will let you know what I find out!

karensjustdessert Posted 2 May 2007 , 7:40pm
post #44 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by khoudek

What I find interesting about the inspector pouring the bleach is that bleach is considered a hazardous material in hospitals and other work places that use it. When we had a bleach spill in the hospital, we had special procedures in place for it's clean up due to its toxic fumes. I think it's weird that the health dept. would condone spilling bleach on everything and exposing people to possible skin and inhalation chemical burns.





Yes! I was thinking...OSHA would not like that one bit.

BrandisBaked Posted 2 May 2007 , 8:30pm
post #45 of 63
DecoratingDingbat Posted 2 May 2007 , 9:40pm
post #46 of 63

icon_eek.gif Wow ...I'm almost afraid to even post this ... shhh ... I've been doing cakes from my home for friends, family and neighbors for years! Never had a problem, never really thought about it even! I know my kitchen is clean, no one has ever complained or been 'sick' ...... after reading these posts and some of the links provided, I'm scared to even cook for my own family!! I have visions of the Health Dept. breaking in my front door and rushing my family to the floor, helicopter whirling overhead with a spotlight on my house and they're throwing bleach all over the place. Incredible when you think about it - I'm willing to bet that the better than half of the home kitchens are actually cleaner and safer than 90% of the fast food places!! As a matter of fact I can think of some popular tv's shows on air, and I remember thinking "should'nt they be wearing gloves?" A few years back my city was speaking of creating a by-law to prevent people from being able to work on their automobiles without a permit (ie: you would have to be a licensed mechanic), and illegal on to do so on residential property. No longer would your husband be able to change the headlight, oil or adjust whatever it is they're adjusting in your own garage. I do believe sometimes the Gov. need to review the meaning of freedom. If someone has a concern about the safety of home baked cakes, then they need to stay with the licensed businesses and pay the $ - that is why they are there!
Now I'm scared to do something nice for someone. What if someone I don't even know reports it because they're upset they were'nt asked to do it? What if I make my own Wedding cake and someone brought an inspector as a date? And what about all the church or school bake sales?Bloody Hell icon_evil.gif it's getting so you can't do anything without the monkey on your back!

gateaux Posted 3 May 2007 , 1:43pm
post #47 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by DecoratingDingbat

icon_eek.gif Wow ...I'm almost afraid to even post this ... shhh ... I've been doing cakes from my home for friends, family and neighbors for years!

Now I'm scared to do something nice for someone. What if someone I don't even know reports it because they're upset they were'nt asked to do it? What if I make my own Wedding cake and someone brought an inspector as a date? And what about all the church or school bake sales?Bloody Hell icon_evil.gif it's getting so you can't do anything without the monkey on your back!




You got it! I love that monkey quote! icon_twisted.gif

I understand we have to be diligent and safe there is no question, I do not want anyone getting sick. But I am also afraid of the day we wont be able to share stuff with anyone. icon_cry.gif
We have to purchase things to bring to school for our kids to share. Because of allergies and what not.
Have you ever looked at those labels? They mention might have been processed where nuts have been and so many other things. With all the allergies around, I dont often trust the big business, it's too easy to make a mistake!

Tell me where someone with major allergies is suppose to get stuff. When I bake for allergic people I have a seperat set of measuring tools, towels, pans and bowls.
I clean my KA 3 times and rinse it with a bleach solution 3 times. Do you think the restaurants and bakeries do this. I clean my towels seperate and keep them seperate. icon_wink.gif

Maybe I go a little overboard, but I do not in any way want any contamination and this makes me feel good about the product I put out. icon_cool.gif
I think we can do a better job at home to keep everything seperate and contamination free. I label all my stuff and that works for me, my allergic friends know what I do.
icon_rolleyes.gif


Good Luck.
icon_smile.gif

peacockplace Posted 3 May 2007 , 1:57pm
post #48 of 63

That's why I don't think that I will ever bake for people with allergies. It's jsut so scarry. I did see a bakery on Martha Stewart that did all kinds of sweets for people with allergies. I think the name was Baby Cakes. I'm just not set up to take on that kind of responsibility.

tammiemarie Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:03pm
post #49 of 63

Something I've never quite understood is would someone selling say, jams and jellies at a Farmer's Market - would they also be subject to the same licensing requirements? I always figured that when you buy something from a "bake sale" environment you are assuming any risk as the buyer. I bring this up because I've considered renting a booth and selling baked goods seasonally, but haven't actually researched it. Anyone know?

BrandisBaked Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:05pm
post #50 of 63

I sell at a farmer's market, and I am required to be licensed and insured.

ladyonzlake Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:06pm
post #51 of 63

I contacted my insurance agent and he also said you have to get a different type of car insurance. If you are out delivering a cake and get into a car accident and your insurance finds out they can deny coverage since you were conducting business with your personal car.
Jacqui

peacockplace Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:11pm
post #52 of 63

icon_mad.gif Stinking insurance... it's darn near impossible to find out every kind you need.

indydebi Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:15pm
post #53 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyonzlake

I contacted my insurance agent and he also said you have to get a different type of car insurance. If you are out delivering a cake and get into a car accident and your insurance finds out they can deny coverage since you were conducting business with your personal car.
Jacqui




ABSOLUTELY!!! We had to put 2 of our 3 vehicles on the commercial policy (at commercial rates!) because I use both of them for business. Plus on a personal policy, if I give my son permission to drive my car and something happens, he's covered. On my commercial policy, he MUST be listed as a driver on the policy or he's NOT covered.

msmith Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:20pm
post #54 of 63

I worked in a bakery in a grocery store. One morning the septic sytem backed up through the floor drains onto the bakery floor. The manager had us mopping it up...and told us to continue baking etc. Yeah - it was on the floor of the proofer also!!! Remember - this was a LICENSED establishment. One of the employees, after our arguing with her that it was unsafe, called the health dept. (on her break). They came - told us to stop - made us put everything in the dumpster and they poured bleach on it...to keep dumpster divers from eating it. EVERYTHING in the bakery then, had to be cleaned and sanitized from the ceilings down. Then they told us not to walk around our houses in our shoes until we had sanitized them too...because we had been walking in raw sewage. So - my point is, having a license - doesn't necessarily mean someone's going to follow the rules!!

indydebi Posted 3 May 2007 , 2:47pm
post #55 of 63

This is an old story, but when I was a teenager, I worked in a fast food restaurant. We had a big snow storm and the manager sent one of the guys up on the roof to shove some of the snow and ice off due to the weight. When the ice was moved, the water started POURING in thru the roof. There was 3 or 4 inches of water in the kitchen cooking area. Teenage boys were walking around all of this electrical equipment in 4" of water!! Yes, the manager made us stay open and continue to work because god forbid we lose our lunch hour business!! We girls up front only had about 1/2" of water to slide around in while serving the food at the front counter.

FOrtunately for we teenage employees, the guys from the health dept happened to come in for lunch. They saw the situation, flashed their badges and shut us down immediately!! Sent all of us home, made all customers leave. The place was closed for about 2 or 3 days while everything was fixed and they passed the re-inspection.

Before we were shut down, me and my sister (oh that poor manager! He had TWO of us to deal with and I was no less mouthy back then!) were on his back about how he just needed to close. There was no sense in making people work with water pouring in on their heads and walking in 4" of water. I mean think of it! Water was coming in thru the roof, thru the insulation, thru the ceiling tiles and landing on the food, the surfaces, the open flame gas cooking surfaces.....! And their attitude was "screw the kids working here .... screw food safety .... we gotta get that lunch dollar!"

So here's another one for those health inspectors as the GOOD guys! thumbs_up.gif

DecoratingDingbat Posted 3 May 2007 , 9:26pm
post #56 of 63

I also used to work for a well known grocery chain Bakery. Anyone who has worked for these stores are well aware that being licensed doesn't necessarily mean following the rules. I can remember more than one 'food fight' with the produce dept. before open hours - I also remember having a loaf of bread returned because someone had lost a bandaid in the package while slicing. Think of all the fast food 'frollicks' that go on behind customer backs. Yes, thumbs_up.gif for the Inspectors!
However .... I can't help but wonder about the incident of poured bleach on the wedding cake. As another member stated, it was during the set up and when asked if she was a licensed kitchen, she honestly said she was not. This just strikes me as wrong, I'm sure she was not on duty while attending a wedding. This seems like a mean, almost vendictive power trip that was uncalled for, would a warning and educating the decorator on the #'s to call been sufficient? There is a very real purpose and need for the inspectors, but I'm curious if some are abusing their power. If inspectors are doing this type of thing everywhere they go, even on their 'off' time, lord help those of us who meet up with them at a family or church BBQ, B-day or wedding celebration! I certainly hope these inspectors are practicing what they preach and not making any of their family B-day, wedding cakes or church picnic meals in their own unlicenced kitchens. I wonder if they have restrictions to follow, ie: is a private wedding considered a public venue - did this inspector have the authority to ruin a private function? I know if I were the bride I would have lodged a formal complaint!

izzybee Posted 3 May 2007 , 11:37pm
post #57 of 63

I live in PA and if you don't make anything that has to be refrigerated, such as cheesecakes or cream pies, you fall under the department of agriculture, which is a cinch to get licensed, as long as you have no pets and not kids running around while you are baking. So cakes and cookies are easy to get legalized here.

marthajo1 Posted 3 May 2007 , 11:41pm
post #58 of 63

I really don't want to hear it izzybee!! J/K of course! (a little) I am just really envious!

CarolAnn Posted 4 May 2007 , 1:14pm
post #59 of 63

I guess I'm not understanding where these wedding are that inspectors are showing up at. Usually banquet halls and hotels have their rules about whether or not they will allow you to bring in cakes from outside source. When using them you ought to be told from the beginning whether or not you can do this. So an inspector can just pop in to a private party, with bleach bottle (and I'm picturing the gallon size here...lol) on them, and declare someone's wedding cake illegal/contaminated and destroy it?

Also, if it's a private family function or public place does that mean we can beat the poop out of them?!? Just kidding!!!!!!!

I just can't imagine how these people can barge in on a private party, pass judgement on a cake and destroy it.

Wendoger Posted 4 May 2007 , 1:46pm
post #60 of 63

yeah, not sure about that pouring bleach on a wedding cake story...sounds more like an urban legend to me...I'm waitin' on marthajo to get back to us about that one thumbs_up.gif

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