Real Alcohol In Cakes = Liquor License????

Business By prterrell Updated 26 Apr 2013 , 10:29pm by aompeanmois

prterrell Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 2:45am
post #1 of 28

If you use real alcohol in your cakes, such as in Tiramisu and Black Forest, do you have to have a liquor license? My DH seems to think one would be required. Was wondering if any of y'all have run into a problem with that?

27 replies
step0nmi Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 2:54am
post #2 of 28

I am thinking because it is such a small amount that you don't need to have one!? I could be wrong!

gateaux Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 2:56am
post #3 of 28

Good Questions?
If you bake it, it evaporates so should not qualify, it you put it in a simple syrup it evaporates also. But I dont know for sure how the licenses bureaus would qualify this.

Anyone??

manderfrog Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 2:58am
post #4 of 28

I wouldn't think so either. Also any alcohol that gets cooked evaporates just leaving the flavor behind.

ccr03 Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 3:03am
post #5 of 28

I don't think so, b/c a liqour license is just if you are selling or handling the actual liquor to the public.

mkolmar Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 3:40am
post #6 of 28

No, you don't need a license, unless you plan on giving them a shot of Jack after they pay for the cake as a Thank You icon_lol.gif (hey, that's a good actually may be a good idea icon_twisted.gif )

JanH Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 7:30am
post #7 of 28

Here's a chart that shows amount of alcohol left after baking/cooking:

http://www.ochef.com/165.htm

HTH

P.S. I'd like a shot of Jack as a thank-you with purchase!

gateaux Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 2:25pm
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Here's a chart that shows amount of alcohol left after baking/cooking:

http://www.ochef.com/165.htm




Wow, JanH, thanks for finding that information, I am going to change a few things in my preps.

Good Luck everyone.

Doug Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 3:30pm
post #9 of 28

check state regs.

in NC regs. state we're not supposed to sell cakes with any kind of alcohol added.

but artificial flavor to mimic ok.

ncdessertdiva Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 6:57pm
post #10 of 28

Doug,
I didn't know that, I learn something new everyday especially on CC!
Thanx,
Leslie

Momkiksbutt Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 7:10pm
post #11 of 28

Well if that were true alot of bakeries would be in trouble!! LOL Remember the alcohol will cook out during baking....so no need for special licensing.

Good question though....

prterrell Posted 13 Apr 2007 , 11:21pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

check state regs.

in NC regs. state we're not supposed to sell cakes with any kind of alcohol added.

but artificial flavor to mimic ok.




Wow, that sucks! Artificial alcohol flavoring tastes like medicine (mmm...cough syrup anyone???)

All of the cakes that I use alcohol in, I brush the liquor directly onto the cake, so there's very llittle evaporation going on. But then there's usually no more than 4 tablespoons in the whole cake.

I'm not gonna worry about it right now as I don't have shop...just was wondering what everyone elses' experiences were since DH brought it up...

jmt1714 Posted 15 Apr 2007 , 3:50pm
post #13 of 28

i know here you there must be something about selling the little chocolates that have alcohol in them to minors - at least I know I was carded when buying them.

TPDC Posted 15 Apr 2007 , 4:01pm
post #14 of 28

I know in Minnesota you need an alchohol license to use it in your cakes.

grami948 Posted 15 Apr 2007 , 4:11pm
post #15 of 28

I can't speak to need for a liquor license however have had personal experience with alcohol *not* totally evaporating during cooking/baking. I have a neurological condition that leaves me highly sensitive to alcohol in that it causes me to lose total control of many muscle groups. icon_eek.gif

I've learned quickly to avoid anything I so much as *think* could be suspect. I accept responsibility if I cause myself embarassment from eating something that I so much as surmise may aggrivate the condition. icon_redface.gif

I'm not pointing fingers or suggesting any of you have a responsibility toward every person who will eat what you make. I'm just sharing from my own experience to reinforce the URL that JanH pointed us toward. Again, I'm not trying to stir up an issue... just trying to share a reality. Thanks thumbs_up.gifusaribbon.gif

MelZ Posted 15 Apr 2007 , 4:18pm
post #16 of 28

I have not used any real alcohol in my cakes so far, because a lot of my cakes are for parties with children in attendance, but this thread is very interesting.

I guess I'll be doing some research on my state laws and see what they have to say before trying any of the recipes that I saved that use alcohol.

gateaux Posted 16 Apr 2007 , 7:34pm
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by grami948

I can't speak to need for a liquor license however have had personal experience with alcohol *not* totally evaporating during cooking/baking. I have a neurological condition that leaves me highly sensitive to alcohol in that it causes me to lose total control of many muscle groups. icon_eek.gif

I've learned quickly to avoid anything I so much as *think* could be suspect. I accept responsibility if I cause myself embarassment from eating something that I so much as surmise may aggrivate the condition. icon_redface.gif

I'm not pointing fingers or suggesting any of you have a responsibility toward every person who will eat what you make. I'm just sharing from my own experience to reinforce the URL that JanH pointed us toward. Again, I'm not trying to stir up an issue... just trying to share a reality. Thanks thumbs_up.gifusaribbon.gif




You brough up a very good point, I know several people who are celiac and cannot have malt of any kind. So most vinegars are out also.
Anything like that can make them ill for several days.

I personally can no longer handle beer and some hard liquors both give me a rash and fever for about 1/2 hour. I have to drink about 1/2 gallon of a water to help. So I stay away.

Whenever I make a anything to share, I now make a point to sharing my ingredients as well. So if there is a question it's all listed. It works for me and my friends appreciate it. We have a few large parties every year and I list all the name of recipes next to the dish and I tell my allergic buddies to check the ingredients list I have on the fridge. I will also make special notes on the name of the recipe if it contains nuts, eggs or something that is not obvious.

Sorry I went off topic, but you would be amazed how many things people are allergic too these days.

Good Luck.

southaustingirl Posted 16 Apr 2007 , 7:50pm
post #18 of 28

what about vanilla, lemon, almond extracts......has anyone read the labels....the alcohol content in lemon extract is higher than vodka!!

I am going to emil the TABC here in Texas and ask them why minors can purchase extracts that have a high alcohol content but can't buy alcohol????

gateaux Posted 17 Apr 2007 , 1:55am
post #19 of 28

If you go to Natural food stores, you can purchase Gluten Free extracts which are not alcohol based.

Frontier Natural Flavors are Gluten and Alcohol Free. They are a bit more expensive, but worth it. The extract are made with Glycerin and natural organic extracts and water.
They have a nice range of flavors.

http://www.frontiercoop.com/dspCatPct.php?ct=ssbfbf

I use these products whenever I know there are allergies and regular when there are no allergies.

The taste is very similar. The only difference is the texture of the extract is more like corn syrup, so you have to adjust with a bit more liquid.

Also you have to be careful with the colors you add to your cakes and icing. There are several products that have ingredients people are allergic too.

Last fall I have to make a cake that was gluten free, soy free, dairy free and banana free. I am just glad I could use eggs! I had to use powdered colors and it was ok.

Good Luck.

ASupergirl Posted 17 Apr 2007 , 12:42pm
post #20 of 28

Time to stir the kettle....What about all of the CCers advice on airbrushing using alcohol mixed with luster dust and such to put on cakes.....HELP!!! I just bought a bottle of vodka to try this and I'm now afraid that I won't be able to use it at all because it never "bakes out" the alcohol....WHAT DO WE DO NOW?!?!?! icon_cry.gif

gateaux Posted 17 Apr 2007 , 6:33pm
post #21 of 28

I always used alcohol to afix my luster dust. In another tread someone said not to do it. Sorry it was weeks ago and I could not figure out which one. But last week I tried it without and I think the results were way better. I had done an experiment with dark chocolate vs white chocolate and the white chocolate covered with luster dust was better, this time, when you look at the pictures the one without alcohol is so much better, it shines.
You can check out my pic, there is 2 1st. communion cakes, 1 is a book the other is round.

I am guessing that is you are using an airbrush that might be different, since I just used "bushy" brushes to paint mine dry.

Good Luck.

southaustingirl Posted 17 Apr 2007 , 8:38pm
post #22 of 28

Iif you use vodka to paint on luster dust, the alcohol will evaporate. It doesn't necessarily have to 'bake' out.

redpanda Posted 17 Apr 2007 , 8:54pm
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

check state regs.

in NC regs. state we're not supposed to sell cakes with any kind of alcohol added.

but artificial flavor to mimic ok.




Being purely pedantic about this...would that mean that alcohol-based artificial alcohol flavorings would be prohibited? Or just alcohol-based real alcohol flavored alcohols?
icon_lol.gif

RedPanda (hmmm a nice Amaretto sounds good right now.)

southaustingirl Posted 27 Apr 2007 , 5:27pm
post #24 of 28

I contacted the alcohol commission here in Texas.....the difference between extracts with high contents of alcohol and, say, vodka is:

vodka is considered to be a beverage and extracts are not.

Also, afor minors, alcohol is OK in foods where the alcohol will be 'cooked' out. But pouring Kahula over some ice cream would not be OK for minors.

MamaMia808 Posted 3 May 2011 , 7:14am
post #25 of 28

As an attorney for the Liquor Commission here in Hawaii, I can say that here you do not need one. There are specific exemptions when alcohol is simply an ingredient in your final product. There are other exemptions but short answer: no.

angeleyes527 Posted 26 Apr 2013 , 9:45pm
post #26 of 28

I am new to starting alcohol infused cakes, I get the point of the alcohol burning off during baking but what about frostings or fillings that have live liquor added?  Would I need some type of permit and if so does anyone know where to apply in the state of Ohio?

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