ajay0665 Posted 22 Apr 2005 , 6:14pm
post #1 of

I tried the fondant. YUCK. Tried the marshmallow fondant - okay tasting but chewy, and my sister, who I am making the cakes for said that didn't sound good. So my next option is to frost them. My plan was to cut cake board tiny bit smaller than each "cake", freeze (chill) for a bit, crumb coat, freeze, frost with buttercream and then smooth finish. I just do cakes for family and friends, mostly just character cakes. I have just started (2 classes in) to Wilton I. Anyone ever tried frosting small "cakes" that have been cut from larger cake? I am planning to torte and fill as well.

Thanks from the newbie..
Anita

12 replies
m0use Posted 22 Apr 2005 , 6:16pm
post #2 of

Your plan sounds good to me thumbs_up.gif

ajay0665 Posted 22 Apr 2005 , 6:19pm
post #3 of

so you think this will work? I am making baby blocks. by cutting the boards for each "cake" do you think this will work? How smooth do you think I can get the frosting? Do you think it is better to use BC with the butter in or with just plain crisco?

so many questions and not enough time....

Also - is marshmallow fondant supposed to be somewhat "chewy"

flayvurdfun Posted 22 Apr 2005 , 6:23pm
post #4 of

sounds like a plan to me too!!! as for if MMF is supposedly to be chewy.... I dont think so... I tried a piece this past weekend that another lady made for a party... it was ok, and it wasnt chewy.... not really.

m0use Posted 22 Apr 2005 , 6:28pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajay0665

so you think this will work? I am making baby blocks. by cutting the boards for each "cake" do you think this will work?



I think this will work fine, and then to make them easier to carry, put them together on one larger board.

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How smooth do you think I can get the frosting?



This will depend on how good you are at smoothing. I could not get my cakes as smooth as I wanted to until I started using the hot knife technique. (Pour boiling water into a large tall glass, let your spatula sit in the hot water to heat off. Take it out, dry it off, and then smooth the icing out. You may need to do this multiple times until your are done.)

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Do you think it is better to use BC with the butter in or with just plain crisco?



I have found that the hot knife recipe works best with 1/2 butter 1/2 crisco recipe, and the paper towel method works better with more crisco in it. (But this is just my personal preference.)

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so many questions and not enough time....



Don't worry you will get alot of answers here.

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Also - is marshmallow fondant supposed to be somewhat "chewy"



Can't help you on this one since I have yet to make marshmallow fondant.
m0use

ajay0665 Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 6:53am
post #6 of

I wanted to let you know that my plan didn't work. icon_sad.gif I think the cakes were just too small to crumb coat. I did put in freezer but didn't want them to be totally frozen as I thought that as they thaw condensation would melt into the frosting. Anyway - while trying to crumb coat the corners kept breaking off. If I had planned on using fondant it probably would have been okay. I finally gave up, threw them away because they were just a mess and made a new 9 x 13 cake and put blocks and baby faces made from MMF on it.

My husband got the cake to my sisters house right as guests were arriving.

She said they all liked the cake and that I would have a few orders coming. Who knows if she really meant that.

So, I guess I would try making baby blocks again but use small square pan and not do anything that I have to cut.

Thanks for your help though.

diane Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 9:58am
post #7 of

you might want to try the icing tip. it will probably go much faster and easier.

stephanie214 Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 6:51pm
post #8 of

Try the upside down method for icing. The spackling knife is really good. This method really works well for me. It is time consuming but well worth the time. thumbs_up.gif

diane Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 6:55pm
post #9 of

where is that upsidedown method?? icon_confused.gificon_confused.gif

stephanie214 Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 7:22pm

Go to search and type in upside down icing.

LAA Posted 25 Apr 2005 , 7:42pm

What about a poured icing for these little guys?


Lisa

ajay0665 Posted 26 Apr 2005 , 2:38am

I have never tried poured icing. Does it have a thick enough consistency? I want the "blocks" to be fully covered,especially the corners.

I may have to try that though. Thanks.

m0use Posted 26 Apr 2005 , 1:49pm

http://cakecentral.com/article6-Upside-Down-Icing-Technique-for-Perfectly-Smooth-Icing.html this is the link for the upside down method; it is in the articles area under Cake Decorating Basics

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