dljc Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 4:06pm
post #1 of

Has anyone tried to put texture on a NFSC cookie using an impression mat?

I plan on making cookie houses (gingerbread houses but without the gingerbread, yuk) for the kids and I was thinking of using the woodgrain and brick impression mats.

I would probably want to impress the cookie first and then cut it out so that I wouldn't distort the final pieces.

Ideas?

Debbie

30 replies
MichelleM77 Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 4:19pm
post #2 of

I don't know, but I think that would be so cute if it worked! Can't wait for some to reply and let us know, or if someone has one and can try it out.

I watched AOC where they used the brick mat on fondant for a brick building. Turned it really cute.

thecupcakemom Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 4:21pm
post #3 of

Where do you get the impression mats?

tricia Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 8:23pm
post #4 of

I use the impression mats on RBC all the time...they look great...I got mine at Lobby Hobby in the clay dept.

CakeDiva73 Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 8:30pm
post #5 of

I just made basketball cookies and when the fondant was warm (right after I applied it to the hot cookie) I put a mat over it and rolled across the give the balls the little squares. I went to Michael's yesterday to see if they had any other designs but there weren't very many. Thanks for the impression-mat ideas...never thought of that! I have some for scrapbooking that I have never used. They are by Fiskars and are about a 5 inch square but they are not flexible so I'm not sure how good they would be..... icon_rolleyes.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 9:19pm
post #6 of

I think she just wants to impress the cookie dough itself, not fondant. Right? I bet you would have to flour the cookie dough well so that the impression mat wouldn't stick.

Where at Michael's did you find your mats, CakeDiva73?

Confectionary2 Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 9:33pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva73

I just made basketball cookies and when the fondant was warm (right after I applied it to the hot cookie) I put a mat over it and rolled across the give the balls the little squares. I went to Michael's yesterday to see if they had any other designs but there weren't very many. Thanks for the impression-mat ideas...never thought of that! I have some for scrapbooking that I have never used. They are by Fiskars and are about a 5 inch square but they are not flexible so I'm not sure how good they would be..... icon_rolleyes.gif




Hey, your cookies look great!!!!! I use the RBC on mine. I looked in the clay dept. at the impression mats @ hobby lobby. Stupid me, I was thinking cakes that day instead of cookies and did not get any. hhmmmm......something to buy now!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Narie Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 9:38pm
post #8 of

Springerle are impressed with a design before they are baked. However, they are also allowed to sit overnight before they are baked. The waiting period allows the surface to harden so that you don't lose the design.

LOVEME Posted 1 Apr 2007 , 11:13pm
post #9 of

I made a great impression mat out of a plastic paint pan.It had a small bubble design.I also use rolling pins and plastic or glass to impress cookie dough or the frosting.Look for the plastic stain glass items in the craft department.They make wonderful inpressions.I will be doing some eggs and a cross that I found.They are only about 25 cents each.I also use a meat pounder that has a small diamond designs on it for my drop cookies.Make tham look great and if you are sugaring the sugar falls into the design.

CakeDiva73 Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 1:35am
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleM77

I think she just wants to impress the cookie dough itself, not fondant. Right? I bet you would have to flour the cookie dough well so that the impression mat wouldn't stick.

Where at Michael's did you find your mats, CakeDiva73?




I'm not sure if you meant where did I find the Fiskars mat? (Beverley's crafts in the embossing/scrapbook dept.) or the mat I used to make the squares on the BB cookies (this was cheap , maybe .39 in the cross stitch/knitting dept. I am think the if we were going for a leather look, we could use a clean cloth, or if we wanted lace, get a piece at the fabric store and use that........this is my new favorite thing to do icon_smile.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 2:58am

Either one is fine. LOL!! Oh, you used plastic canvas to make the basketball texture? Never ever would have thought of that! I'll have to check out the embossing section next time I'm at the store. Never would have thought of that either. icon_smile.gif

dljc Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 1:31pm

Michelle is correct in that I want to impress the cookie dough itself to give the cookie texture that the kids will just add frosting decorations to.

The mats that I purchased were from Cakes by Sam. The site has both impression mats (http://www.cakesbysam.com/store/cart.php?target=category&category_id=263) and rolling pins (http://www.cakesbysam.com/store/cart.php?target=category&category_id=271). I could serious spend some money here.

Springerle look interesting but I don't know if I'm patient enough to wait overnight to let that many cookies dry . . .

LOVEME has some great ideas for finding inspiration in using other items . . . The plastic stain glass pieces are perfect. I'll have to take a look at those in the future.

Since no one else is doing exactly what I was considering, I guess I just go for it myself. I'll post pictures (good or bad) when I try.

Thanks all,
Debbie

cambo Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 1:43pm

Yeah....I think she wants to impress the dough....never tried it, but man would that look cute if it worked! They use different mats to impress gingerbread all the time so I'm not sure why it wouldn't work! If you try it, please post your results!

shanzah67 Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 3:34pm

Thanks for the links DLJC! icon_biggrin.gif

fragglerock1 Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 10:08pm

I just bought some texture mats from Michael's. They are supposed to be used for clay, but I figure I could use them for fondant too. They are from Makins, four different textures in a pack for $4.

annerachelle Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 1:01am

For sugar cookies, I've tried texture mats on top of (crusted) buttercream without great success.

Does anyone have advice about what icing tastes best and looks good using texture mats on cookies?

I don't think the taste of fondant would be great on sugar cookies and I've just found the recipe for rolled buttercream that I'm curious to try.

Thanks for your help!

MichelleM77 Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 1:06am

I think your only choice is fondant. I think it tastes just fine on sugar cookies (Satin Ice). There are wonderful recipes too.

Rolled buttercream is much too greasy for my taste, but you will have to play around and find what works best for you. Fun! icon_smile.gif

makeminepink Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 1:34am
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerachelle

For sugar cookies, I've tried texture mats on top of (crusted) buttercream without great success.

Does anyone have advice about what icing tastes best and looks good using texture mats on cookies?

I don't think the taste of fondant would be great on sugar cookies and I've just found the recipe for rolled buttercream that I'm curious to try.

Thanks for your help!




I love the taste of fondant on cookies!! You need to try it-- you'll be surprised how great it is. I use a recipe that is a little softer than NFSC. I believe it's Soft Sugar Cookies in the recipe section and Rhonda's Ultimate MMF. I don't think anyone would know it was fondant if you didn't tell them-- unless of course they decorate cakes/cookies!

bobwonderbuns Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 4:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerachelle

For sugar cookies, I've tried texture mats on top of (crusted) buttercream without great success.

Does anyone have advice about what icing tastes best and looks good using texture mats on cookies?

I don't think the taste of fondant would be great on sugar cookies and I've just found the recipe for rolled buttercream that I'm curious to try.

Thanks for your help!




Fondant taste just fine on top of cookies. Unless it's Wilton fondant, which doesn't taste good on anything! icon_confused.gif I use Satin Ice and Jen's homemade white chocolate fondant, both of which are very good. I also use a plain Vanilla flavored cookie and use sieved jam for the "glue" which adds extra flavor. And the nice thing about decorating cookies with fondant is that you have a lot more decorating options open to you. icon_lol.gif

Phyllis52 Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 12:29am

bobwonderbuns -

Do you put the fondant on the cookies just out of the oven with the sieved jam or do you do that after the cookies are cooled?

Sounds delicious.....

Thanks.
Phyllis

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 12:57am

I wait until the cookies are cooled -- when I put the jam on it acts like glue so I don't have to catch the cookies "right" out of the oven.

3LittleBeesCookies Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 1:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Quote:
Originally Posted by annerachelle

For sugar cookies, I've tried texture mats on top of (crusted) buttercream without great success.

Does anyone have advice about what icing tastes best and looks good using texture mats on cookies?

I don't think the taste of fondant would be great on sugar cookies and I've just found the recipe for rolled buttercream that I'm curious to try.

Thanks for your help!



Fondant taste just fine on top of cookies. Unless it's Wilton fondant, which doesn't taste good on anything! icon_confused.gif I use and Jen's homemade white chocolate fondant, both of which are very good. I also use a plain Vanilla flavored cookie and use sieved jam for the "glue" which adds extra flavor. And the nice thing about decorating cookies with fondant is that you have a lot more decorating options open to you. icon_lol.gif






MMF tastes great on cookies, also. I gave some for samples and got an order on the spot. I like to use MMF on a shobread recipe that I have. I roll it out a little thinner than I do for for just the plain shortbread.

Phyllis52 Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 10:21am

bobwonderbuns -

How much ahead of time do you cut out the fondant for your cookie tops? Do I have a few hours? I really like your idea with the jam, an extra flavor they don't expect.

Thanks.

KHalstead Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 3:01pm

I have a cookie book (by Autumn Carpenter) and she used the candy molds and literally bakes cookie dough IN THE MOLD!! to make brick impressions, cobblestone, etc.

HTH

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 11:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyllis52

bobwonderbuns -

How much ahead of time do you cut out the fondant for your cookie tops? Do I have a few hours? I really like your idea with the jam, an extra flavor they don't expect.

Thanks.




Okay lets use these dress and shoe cookies as an example and I'll tell you how I did the cookies: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1269737

First, I use a rolled cookie dough. Any dough with the word "rolled" in it will work -- you don't want to use a sugar cookie because they tend to be too soft to hold up to heavy decoration. Rolled cookies are generally sturdier and not as sweet (which is essential if you're decorating with sugars and such.) No need to give them diabetic shock after the first bite... icon_cool.gif I roll the dough out between parchment sheets using the smart rolling pin (I LOVE that thing!) icon_biggrin.gif Then I cut out the shapes, put them on the silpat lined cookie sheet and chill several hours (if not overnight.) The key to fabulous cookies is making them cold, baking them hot. Then in a preheated oven I bake until they are just turning gold around the edges. Any more than that they'll be too crunchy.

I bake lots of cookies at a time (one batch makes roughly 40-42 cookies, depending on size.) Let them cool on racks. Now you have the option of decorating at this point or storing them in a airtight container for later use. When I go to decorate, I take the cookies and the color of fondant I'm going to need and whatever tools I need. In the case of the dress and shoes cookies I needed red and white fondant, my mini pearlmaker, a textured rolling pin and a flower mold. Have all these all set up with your fondant tools ready to go.

Now I knead up the red fondant, having made the red flowers first, I roll out and texture the fondant, cut with the cookie cutter, brush the sieved jam on the back of the fondant (not on the cookie itself) and gently press on. Continue decorating as you see fit. Because fondant is the Diva of all sugar icings, (you have to deal with her RIGHT NOW and she is very high maintainence), you don't have the option of rolling out and texturing ahead of time or your fondant will dry out.

I hope that helps. These cookies can be labor intensive, depending on how much or how little decor you want to put into them. I like doing things production line style so that's what works for me. icon_biggrin.gif

Phyllis52 Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 11:42pm

Thanks bobwonderbuns,

Your cookies are just beautiful! The fondant looks like it fits perfectly, not uneven at all. I appreciate it so much on exactly how you do it. Gotcha on the part about fondant drying out, I certainly don't want to make that mistake. I have a couple of questions though - how thick do you roll your cookies? I can't seem to find a rolled cookie recipe. Isn't the modified NFSC recipe one? Now I'm confused..... icon_cry.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 11:47pm

Do a google search for "rolled" cookie dough and there are LOTS of recipes that come up. Gingerbread is one example -- rolled gingerbread cookies. I don't use the NFSC recipe because I'm happy with my own so I can't comment on that. I roll my cookies between 1/8 and 1/4 inch thick (the smallest thickness on the smart rolling pin.)

Phyllis52 Posted 23 Mar 2010 , 10:48am

bobwonderbuns -

I've been searching for rolled cookie recipes and they all end up saying "this is a delicious sugar cookie recipe". Am I missing something? What's the difference?

Since it's a favor for a wedding, I was looking at vanilla flavored and even when I google, it shows up saying "Rolled sugar cookie recipes".

Boy do I feel stupid................

Thanks.

bobwonderbuns Posted 23 Mar 2010 , 11:44pm

Try this: http://www.thatsmyhome.com/hannahs/cookies/Rolled.htm

bobwonderbuns Posted 23 Mar 2010 , 11:46pm

Rolled cookies can be a version of a sugar cookie -- the sugar/butter/flour ratio is different than a regular sugar cookie thus making it more durable for decoration.

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