hillmn Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 6:31pm
post #1 of

Does it dry hard like royal icing or does it dry hard with a soft center? Also, does it dry matted or shiny? I used a shiny cookie icing and I think I like the matted look of royal icing better but I don't like the hardness. I am also curious about Alice's Cookie Icing, does this dry semi hard or stay soft like cake buttercream?

26 replies
laura_d_v Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 6:40pm
post #2 of

Would love to know this as well...

hillmn Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 7:33pm
post #3 of

Bump...help? I am going to make cookies tonight.

Cake_Princess Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 7:49pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillmn

Does it dry hard like royal icing or does it dry hard with a soft center? Also, does it dry matted or shiny? I used a shiny cookie icing and I think I like the matted look of royal icing better but I don't like the hardness. I am also curious about Alice's Cookie Icing, does this dry semi hard or stay soft like cake buttercream?





Antonia's icing is royal icing.

Alice cookie icing will dry hard enough to be stacked but it wont dry rock hard like royal icing.

Also, sometime you won't get an answer right away when you post your question. Try using the search function on the site. You can usually find that the answer you need has already been answered. Use keywords in your search to help you narrow down the results.


I hope this helps.

mitsel8 Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 7:58pm
post #5 of

Maybe I can help.
Antonia's icing does dry hard, but not so hard that you would break a tooth. It dries very matte, not shiny at all.
Toba's icing (in the recipe section) doesn't dry as hard, but it is very shiny. It also takes longer to dry, I usually allow 24 hours before I package the cookies.
I tried Alice's icing once and it never dried hard enough for me to package.
My early pictures (Valentine hearts, ducks, wedding cake cookies) were all done with Toba's icing.
All of my recent cookies (spring, bugs, christmas tree) were all done with Antonia's icing recipe.
I hope this helps.

patton78 Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 8:05pm
post #6 of

I find that I like Antonia's icing a bit better than regular royal icing, it does not seem to dry as rock hard as royal and has a better flavor. It is very easy to decorate with, especially for intricate details. I do not like Alice's icing for decorating my cookies due to the fact that it does not dry hard, at least not in my experience. I waited 2 days and the icing still got dents in it when stacked, it is also not as easy to decorate with in my opinion, too thick and it tends to seperate when colors are added. It does have a better flavor though because it has butter added.

antonia74 Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 8:06pm
post #7 of

You can PM me, I'll answer anything! icon_cool.gif

My recipe is thinned royal icing, it's not rock hard at all. You don't "break a tooth" on it....that's a pretty bad selling point, so I made alterations to a regular royal icing recipe just for that very reason. The water thins it out just enough to still be controlled when piping, but but so thick that the cookie is unenjoyable. You'll also find that the butter content in the cookie keeps it just a bit soft under the dried surface. BUT, leave it for 4 or 5 days in the air to dry and it's harder than it should be.

It's hard enough to package and stack cookies, yes.

shanasweets Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 8:13pm
post #8 of

Where is this receipe, I can't find when I key word in receipes? I would love to try.

hillmn Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 9:05pm
post #9 of

Thank you! Everyone is always so helpful!

cinderspritzer Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 10:07pm

You can make it shinier by adding clear Karo syrup to it. Lemon juice takes away from the eggy smell of all RI's and doesn't impact the flavor at all.

patton78 Posted 29 Mar 2007 , 11:36pm

Here is the recipe, it is called Royal Icing for Decorated Cookied under the recipe section

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-1983-Royal-Icing-for-Decorated-Cookies.html

Cake_Princess Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 2:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsel8


I tried Alice's icing once and it never dried hard enough for me to package.





Quote:
Originally Posted by patton78


I do not like Alice's icing for decorating my cookies due to the fact that it does not dry hard, at least not in my experience.





How much water are you guys adding to your recipe? I don't ever thin my recipe as often suggested on this site and I never have an issue with cookies not being able to be packaged or stacked and I use Alice cookie icing almost exclusively.

Here's a cookie bouquet made using alice cookie icing.
LL

mitsel8 Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 2:39am

Hi Cake Princess-
I must have done something wrong cause when I made Alice's icing it didn't look anything like your cookies! Your cookies look great!
I think I did add too much water.
Maybe I'll try it again soon.
Thanks for the info.

patton78 Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 2:40am

If I do not add water to the icing, it cannot be "flooded" and this is how I prefer to decorate my cookies. I found that Alices cookie icing is way too thick to flood with unless a lot of water is added and then it still is not great. I guess it all just depends on how you like to decorate and what cosistency icing works best for you.

Cake_Princess Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 3:02am
Quote:
Originally Posted by patton78

If I do not add water to the icing, it cannot be "flooded" and this is how I prefer to decorate my cookies. I found that Alices cookie icing is way too thick to flood with unless a lot of water is added and then it still is not great. I guess it all just depends on how you like to decorate and what cosistency icing works best for you.





Alice cookie icing was not designed to be used for flood. There is fat molecules in it so it does not have the same properties as a royal icing or a glace icing.

I find the heat from my hand makes it easy for me work it with my spatula and my brushes.

And yes, adding too much water will definitely compromise the strength of this icing. You will have difficulties stacking and packing if you add too much water.

suzmazza Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 4:50am

I use Wiltons Royal Icing recipe, but I thin it down to the point where you can use it almost like color flow (flooding technique). The icing sets up stiff after a few hours of drying, but doesnt get like a rock, and I think it tastes alot better thinned down. I later found out that a nice thin base coat, and a thicker version for piping works very well. I use a #2 tip to do detail, as #1 just is too small for a stiffer icing (for cookie bouquets). Try using a squirt bottle to regulate the amount of liquid added when mixing, so that you don't ruin an entire batch with too much water. Hope this helps, and happy decorating!! icon_smile.gif

yumcupcakes Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 5:23am

ok, I am SUPER confused. I searched for this topic because I am going to make cookies for the first time but really don't know what kind of icing to use!! I want to decorate them (have the icing flooded, yet have lines on them with thicker icing) and I have no idea how to do this. I was thinking I could use colorflow to do the flooding part and use royal icing to draw lines and other designs. Am I wrong? Maybe I'm just making things complicated......

Please help! thanks!!

yumcupcakes Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 5:24am

and I completely forgot to mention that I want to individualy wrap each cookie.....

patton78 Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 12:35pm

If you want to flood and decorate your cookies with designs, you can use royal icing to do both! I would not recommend using color flow because it does not taste good and it literally dries rock hard. Just make a batch of royla icing and use a thin consistency for flooding and a medium consistency for decorating/detailing your cookies. This is how I decorate all of my cookies and it workd out great. Good luck!

7yyrt Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 2:14pm

Calm down, take a deep breath - remember it's only cookies, if you mess up just eat the evidence!

Now, go to this link:
http://www.cakecentral.com/article54-How-To-Bake--Decorate-Cookies.html

it will have the answer to most of your questions...

antonia74 Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 3:16pm

***UPDATE!***

Thanks for the PM's! I'm really happy to answer any questions.

Just to let you all know, due to the confusion of people searching for "Antonia74 Icing" in the recipe section and coming up blank...I just requested that Heath changed my "Royal Icing for Decorated Cookies" recipe to the name "Antonia74 Icing".

Hope that ends the confusion! Thanks everyone!! icon_smile.gif

yumcupcakes Posted 30 Mar 2007 , 4:46pm

thanks everyone! you guys are great icon_smile.gif

jill27 Posted 31 Mar 2007 , 2:31pm

well i tried the "royal icing for decorated cookies" and loved the fact that it was so easy to decorate with. the taste is good, but not great, kwim? i don't want to try the "alice cookie icing" since i read all the problems every one was having with it. i guess i'll try toba's next week for easter cookies. icon_biggrin.gif

practiceandpatience Posted 31 Mar 2007 , 2:48pm

I use MMF for the main frosting of my cookies. I then use Alice's recipe for the detailing. I love that it dries hard enough to bag, but still soft enough when eating. I also like the flavor Alice's recipe adds due to having a bit of butter in it.

antonia74 Posted 2 Apr 2007 , 2:47am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jill27

well i tried the "royal icing for decorated cookies" and loved the fact that it was so easy to decorate with. the taste is good, but not great, kwim? i don't want to try the "alice cookie icing" since i read all the problems every one was having with it. i guess i'll try toba's next week for easter cookies. icon_biggrin.gif




Add some non-oil-based flavouring for taste. I actually use a brand of meringue powder that has a very strong vanilla flavour built right in. When I created the recipe, I didn't realize that some meringue powders have no flavours added already....so in this case, you'll have to add your own.

jill27 Posted 3 Apr 2007 , 2:02pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonia74

Quote:
Originally Posted by jill27

well i tried the "royal icing for decorated cookies" and loved the fact that it was so easy to decorate with. the taste is good, but not great, kwim? i don't want to try the "alice cookie icing" since i read all the problems every one was having with it. i guess i'll try toba's next week for easter cookies. icon_biggrin.gif



Add some non-oil-based flavouring for taste. I actually use a brand of that has a very strong vanilla flavour built right in. When I created the recipe, I didn't realize that some meringue powders have no flavours added already....so in this case, you'll have to add your own.




i did add vanilla...thanks though!

banba Posted 9 Apr 2007 , 11:44pm

Hello

I live in Ireland and on this side of the pond we mostly all use RI. To keep it soft we add a couple of drops of glycerine to it and it does the trick! Hope this helps?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%