Kos Posted 10 Mar 2006 , 1:08pm
post #1 of

Just when I think I'm getting the hang of this stuff, I have a disastrous batch. I used the Toba Garrett's icing to flood. I got my normal white (sugar-crystallizing) bumps. icon_mad.gif

I did the detailing with royal icing. After detailing, I watched carefully with my pin in hand. icon_eek.gif Nothing, whew! I left the house and when I got back, I had not just little air-bubbles but major pot-holes! I notice some websites suggest to use the paddle when mixing to prevent air bubbles. What if I don't have paddles? Any tips or suggestions?

Also, how do you mix colors in without adding air-bubbles.

icon_cry.gif

Joan

4 replies
peg818 Posted 10 Mar 2006 , 1:27pm
post #2 of

you need to mix gently, so to minimize the bubbles. But i also, after i mix i cover the mixed icing and let it set for awhile so the air bubbles have a chance to develope then gently stir just before using.

Jenn2179 Posted 10 Mar 2006 , 1:35pm
post #3 of

When I used Toba's icing recipe I just mixed it by hand with a spoon and didn't have any air bubbles. Tapping the bowl on the counter might help along with tapping the cookies.

taniabanana Posted 10 Mar 2006 , 8:18pm
post #4 of

I found (on a chemisrty site) that lukewarm water has less oxygen than cold water, that might help thumbs_up.gif

nc123 Posted 10 Mar 2006 , 9:41pm
post #5 of

While not a suggestion, I always mix my royal icing with a paddle for that reason. I've always had problems with air bubbles until I switched to a paddle. Same with warming up buttercream. Perhaps mixing whatever icing you're making by hand as suggested above?

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