How Do I Use Hi Ratio/sweetex?

Decorating By mami2sweeties Updated 13 Mar 2009 , 4:33am by FlourPots

mami2sweeties Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 4:05pm
post #1 of 30

My local bakery sells this to the public crowd. How do I use it? Do I just my same recipes and replace this instead of the crisco? Is there a more right ratio of shortening and powdered sugar? I know this stuff won't be cheap so I don't want to mess it up.

29 replies
llj68 Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 4:24pm
post #2 of 30

I just use it in place of Crisco in my bc icing recipes. I use the same measurements I would Crisco.

Note, however, I do not use it for anything else besides bc. It's too expensive.

Lisa

CakemanOH Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 6:51pm
post #3 of 30

You actually use less hi ration shortening than crisco because it holds liquid better and does not break down like crisco.

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:00pm
post #4 of 30

Hi that is all I use is sweetex and I use it just like I did the crisco, I have never used less so not sure if it does the same maybe I should try it. I can tell you, you get a much better tasting buttercream (my opinion)!!!!!!!!

mami2sweeties Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:26pm
post #5 of 30

I will try it. I will just add the liquid a little at a time to make sure I don't add too much.

Another question, can Sweetex be used with butter as in a 50/50 butter/sweetex recipe? Or does it have to be all Sweetex?

crisseyann Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:30pm
post #6 of 30

This is the recipe I use for Sweetex buttercream. It uses only 1 1/2 cups Sweetex per 2 lbs. powdered sugar. It's the ONLY non-butter buttercream I use anymore.

Sweetex Frosting


1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp butter flavor
1/4 tsp almond flavor
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 cups Sweetex
1 TBS meringue powder
1/2 tsp popcorn salt
2 lbs. powdered sugar

Add salt, vanilla, butter, and almond flavors to measuring cup. Add cold water to make 1/2 cup.

Beat Sweetex and slowly add water until fully incorporated. Beat in meringue powder. Gradually add powdered sugar. Beat 2 minutes at medium speed.

This recipe is in its original form.however.*I* dont use popcorn salt, just regular table salt. Popcorn salt is finer ground so I guess it would dissolve better, but I find regular salt is just fine. Just make sure to stir until dissolved.

Also, I have made this with AND without the meringue powder. I found no difference. I think the meringue powder is supposed to make the frosting stand up better in heat and humidity.

HTH! icon_smile.gif

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:30pm
post #7 of 30

NO I use 50/50 and now that I am thinking because it has been so long from the last time I used crisco, I only use about 1/2 cup of liquid if that much plus the flavoring!!!!

ps3884 Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:35pm
post #8 of 30

What is Sweetex??? I haven't heard of it before. Thanks.

itsacake Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:36pm
post #9 of 30

I use hi-ratio in my IM"buttercream" (I know, I know, let's NOT go there again). I measure it by weight, so it is the same by volume as Crisco, but less than butter. Butter is 14 grams per Tablespoon and Crisco and hi-ratio (at least the brand I use) is 12 grams per Tablespon.

Since I bought 50 lbs of hi-ratio and it was much less expensive than Crisco. I have also used it for baking. It supposedly shouldn't work, but so far I've had no problems.

Just ny $.02. Your mileage may vary icon_smile.gif

Shalom,
itsacake!

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:38pm
post #10 of 30

it is a high ratio shorting

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:40pm
post #11 of 30

WOW here in Michigan it is more expensive that crisco lucky you!! (edited again for spelling my fingers are not working today forgive me)

ps3884 Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:40pm
post #12 of 30

Thanks for the quick answer cakebybek.

Can someone explain the benefit of using this instead of Crisco? Thanks.

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:43pm
post #13 of 30

I think it is better texture and does not leave the crisco after taste and it just mixes better too.(smoother)

itsacake Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:44pm
post #14 of 30

I think (and I dont' have time to research further right now) that it is called hi-ratio becasue you can use a higher than usual ratio of sugar to shortening with it. This makes cakes sweeter and also more tender and I think also more moist which is what commercial bakeries want. It also allows for less shortening in icing which cuts down on the greasy "mouthfeel" some people get with regular shortening.

Hope this helps. Maybe someone else has a more scientific answer.....


Shalom,
itsacake!

ps3884 Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:44pm
post #15 of 30

Thanks again. I'll have to give this a try.

cakebybek Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 7:51pm
post #16 of 30

Yes

itsacake you are right forgot that it does make you cakes sooooooooo moist all of my family and friends are always asking how do you do that and I have to tell them (my secret) but now its out lol!!!!!!!!

itsacake Posted 24 Feb 2006 , 11:34pm
post #17 of 30

cakebybek,

Even though I've been using the hi-ratio for baking as well as icing (the box says hi-ratio cake and icing shortening) I don't actually have any cake recipes calling for hi-ratio shortening. I understand they usually have more sugar and liquid. Do you have such recipes? If so, can you tell us about them?

Thanks in advance for any info.

Shalom,
itsacake!

edited for spelling

CakemanOH Posted 25 Feb 2006 , 1:07am
post #18 of 30

There are different hi ratio shortenings for icing, baking and deep frying. Bakeries use all 3 different ones which is how they get those donuts tasting so damn good. thumbs_up.gif

CakemanOH Posted 25 Feb 2006 , 1:10am
post #19 of 30

Ok Here is my recipe for icing: For those sweetex users you can get away with 1 cup. Trust me! It is 2/3rd's hi ratio vs whatever crisco amount.

1 Cup Hi Ratio Shortening
4 TBL White Icing Base
7 cups 6x Powder Sugar
1/2 cup water
1 tsp or to taste what ever flavor you want. You can use extracts or louann flavored oils but use less of the oil flavoring because it is strong. I use my own flavoring mixture that gives me a unique great tasting icing.
No special mixing routine. Just put it all in your mixer and whip it to a bright fluffy white great tasting icing. The powdered sugar is key here. It must be 6x which is commercial grade. Powder sugar at 6x is a must for icing!!!!!!!

mami2sweeties Posted 25 Feb 2006 , 1:19am
post #20 of 30

What is white icing base?

CakemanOH Posted 26 Feb 2006 , 1:38pm
post #21 of 30

Goes by Icing base or Angel white. It is a base to help the icing fluff up real creamy and smooth and creates stability.

crisseyann Posted 26 Feb 2006 , 1:44pm
post #22 of 30

ceculsk...I have a question regarding your post.

I've seen 6x powdered sugar at my local cake decorating store. I was under the assumption that the higher the number (example 10x) the better the sugar was for icing, being sifted that many more times. I wondered why a cake shop sells the 6x if supposedly the 10 should be better. I probably have my information screwed up. LOL Could you please clarify for me? Thanks!

cakebybek Posted 26 Feb 2006 , 2:01pm
post #23 of 30

itsacake

Hi my recipie for buttercream is

1 pound white margarine
1 pound sweetex
3-4 pounds powdered sugar (10x)
4teaspoons flavering.......
2tsp. vanilla
1tsp. butter flavor
1/2tsp.kremo
1/2tsp. almond emulsion

(I also use 2tlb. egg white powder not in org recipie but works well for me.)

I cream shorting and sweetex together, add sugar and water, mix, add in flavorings, beat 10 minutes on medium!!!!!

Let me know if you try it and if you like it as much as we do?

CakemanOH Posted 27 Feb 2006 , 1:49am
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Quote:

ceculsk...I have a question regarding your post.

I've seen 6x powdered sugar at my local cake decorating store. I was under the assumption that the higher the number (example 10x) the better the sugar was for icing, being sifted that many more times. I wondered why a cake shop sells the 6x if supposedly the 10 should be better. I probably have my information screwed up. LOL Could you please clarify for me? Thanks!





6x powder sugar is far better for icing than 10x. Here is why: Bakeries use 6 x and it is considered bakery grade for a few of reasons. 1. It does not clump like 10 times has the ability to do. 10 x is too fine and will clump on you. 2. 10 x will get gritty because it is too fine. 6 x will not get gritty. 3. 6 x will allow the icing to remain more stiff than 10x which will break down quicker in a temp change. especially using crisco and butter versus a good alpine and icing base.

Here is a blurb to back up my statement above from The Sugar Bible. As you can see the finer it is the more corn starch they need to add to make it hopefully not lump. At that point it states that it is then less suitable to use for non cooked items. 6x and 4 x are commercial grade and will make a better icing. Hope this helps all of you with your icing endevors.

"As might be expected, the finer the granulation, the greater the tendency of the sugar to lump, which explains why cornstarch is added to absorb any moisture from the air before the sugar can. The cornstarch adds what is perceived as a floury taste and makes powdered sugar less suitable than granulated sugar for use with ingredients that are not to be cooked. Powdered sugar comes in four degrees of fineness: 10xx, the finest; 10x, available in supermarkets; and 6x and 4x, both of which are available commercially."

crisseyann Posted 27 Feb 2006 , 3:07pm
post #25 of 30

That makes perfect sense! Thank you for responding. Rather than picking up my usual 7 lb bag of 10X today at Sam's, I'm going to my cake shop and buying the 6X. I didn't notice price, but I'm going to give it a try anyway. I have my final cake for Class 1 tomorrow so I'm eager to see how this works. Thanks again! icon_smile.gif

loriemoms Posted 27 Feb 2006 , 4:37pm
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

ceculsk...I have a question regarding your post.

I've seen 6x powdered sugar at my local cake decorating store. I was under the assumption that the higher the number (example 10x) the better the sugar was for icing, being sifted that many more times. I wondered why a cake shop sells the 6x if supposedly the 10 should be better. I probably have my information screwed up. LOL Could you please clarify for me? Thanks!




I have heard of 6x but have never seen it!! Of course, we don't have any bakery supply stores here. (except Michaels..) I tell you, i am tempted to open one!

CakemanOH Posted 28 Feb 2006 , 2:02am
post #27 of 30

GFS carries 6 x . For a 25 pund box it is 12 dollars.

FlourPots Posted 12 Mar 2009 , 2:54am
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebybek



Hi my recipie for buttercream is

1 pound white margarine
1 pound sweetex
3-4 pounds powdered sugar (10x)
4teaspoons flavering.......
2tsp. vanilla
1tsp. butter flavor
1/2tsp.kremo
1/2tsp. almond emulsion





I realize this is a really old thread, but anyone know what Kremo is?? I looked it up, but no luck.

JanH Posted 13 Mar 2009 , 3:05am
post #29 of 30

You can buy a gallon of it here:

http://www.medinabaking.com/espanol/willmark.html

FlourPots Posted 13 Mar 2009 , 4:33am
post #30 of 30

Thanks so much Jan...I'm going to find out if they sell a much smaller size to try it out.

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