Food Dehydrator?

Decorating By Uberhipster Updated 14 May 2009 , 1:05am by kjgjam22

Uberhipster Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 5:14am
post #1 of 12

I've had too many last minute cake orders that require hard fondant decorations - and I was wondering if anyone has ever used a food dehydrator to speed the hardening process along?

11 replies
gma1956 Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 6:05am
post #2 of 12

I really don't think that will work, because the dehydrator used heat. Fondant needs air time, NOT heat.

chaptlps Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 6:07am
post #3 of 12

Hiya Uber...
I would try it with a scrap piece of fondant just to see if it did work. You never know you might have hit on something. So let us know how it turns out if you try it.

Kiddiekakes Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 2:13pm
post #4 of 12

I have heard people doing this.Never tried myself!!

hn87519 Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 2:16pm
post #5 of 12

Interesting idea. Please post your results!

beachcakes Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 2:38pm
post #6 of 12

Personally, I don't have one, but I've heard of people on this site using it with success!

laneysmom Posted 16 Feb 2006 , 2:41pm
post #7 of 12

Really interesting idea! Never thought of trying it. My dehydrator sits in the attic collecting dust! I may have to break it out to give it a shot.

It does use heat, but it's a very low temp heat and a constant airflow--almost convection-like. I used to use it to dry fruit, but I could never wait long enogh for the fruit to dry. It would take hours!

ShyannAutumn Posted 17 Feb 2006 , 3:46pm
post #8 of 12

from personal experience... yes, a dehydrater works well but make sure you have the object you are drying on the highest racks away from the burner. I would recommend 3rd and 4th tray and up. There is good and bad news in this working. Flat pieces are great but any object that has curves or waves... you have a 50-50 shot at maintaining the culpture. If you have more then 5 dehydration treys, use them. Place the object on the top tray and check on it periodically. Avoid touching the piece at any time unless you are trying to salvage a curve/wave. A spoon, marble, ect. can help. If for some reason you can't resist the touch (*grins* from guilt) don't panic or through it away if it feels "melting" soft to the touch. As long as it has it's shape your are doing great. You can rotate the pieces as you would fruits or meats but do not go below the 3rd trey.

Not an expert just a creative, bored explorer. icon_wink.gif


Good Luck
Shyann

stephanie214 Posted 18 Feb 2006 , 11:26am
post #9 of 12

Think I'll give it a try, how long will it take to dry?

NEWTODECORATING Posted 18 Feb 2006 , 11:37am
post #10 of 12

I have used the dehydrator in a pinch and it worked great! Like previously mentioned flat pieces work best.
I also elevate a rack when making gumpaste roses or MMF ones. Then the toothpick falls down through the wholes and I have a perfect method of moving things quickly when nap time is done and my real job is awake. LOL

momsandraven Posted 19 Feb 2006 , 4:32am
post #11 of 12

I just did this last weekend for some fondant roses and it worked like a charm! I did them the same way NEWTODECORATING does hers, letting the toothpick drop between the trays. I did have one or two droop a little, but overall it was definitely a success!

kjgjam22 Posted 14 May 2009 , 1:05am
post #12 of 12

i know this is a very old post. i just used my dehydrater for the first time. things seemed to get moist so i unplugged it and left them in there and they seem to be fine now. i am making loops out of gumpaste for a bow.

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