Sticking Wires Into Cake

Decorating By MandyE Updated 15 Feb 2016 , 4:34pm by DeniseNH

MandyE Posted 1 Mar 2007 , 9:18pm
post #1 of 17

I asked this earlier but got no response, so I thought I would change my subject and see if it helped. icon_biggrin.gif

I'm making a bridal shower cake with a valentine theme. I want to have hearts sticking out of the top of the cake on some kind of bendable device. I've seen cakes like this and it looks like some kind of wire. Can you just stick this metallic stuff directly into the cake? And what are they and where do you buy them?

Help me please!!! TIA!

16 replies
blessBeckysbaking Posted 1 Mar 2007 , 10:38pm
post #2 of 17

I use flower wires cut the lenght i like then i wrap them around a thin wood dowel and insert my fondant cutout on end of wire let it dry a day or so then insert in cake where desired Yes just stick in cake as is

Doug Posted 1 Mar 2007 , 11:16pm
post #3 of 17

bare wire NOT a good idea

insert plastic straws or coffee stirrers first and then put wire in that.

use only UNpainted, UNwrapped wire....best is to find stainless steel.

wash thoroughly and sanitize before using.

leily Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 12:12am
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

bare wire NOT a good idea

insert plastic straws or coffee stirrers first and then put wire in that.

use only UNpainted, UNwrapped wire....best is to find stainless steel.

wash thoroughly and sanitize before using.




I second what Doug said

For more topics on this do a search in the forums. This topic has been brought up quite a bit lately. I am sure you will find more advice too,

Fairytale Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 5:18am
post #5 of 17

You'll get a lot of different opinions on this. I stick my wire directly into the cake. I always use cloth covered floral wire.

franjmc Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 6:18am
post #6 of 17

It's against food safety regulations, here in Australia to insert wires into any sort of food. I have no idea what the rules are in the rest of the world. In cake decorating, we are supposed to use flower picks, which I do, all the time, but many, many, many decorators just insert the wires straight into the cakes. It's not a matter of the wires contaminating the cake with rust, it's a problem with the serving of the cake. If the person cutting the cake makes a small error and cuts some of the wire, the cake can become quite a health risk to the person who shoves that particular piece in their mouth, especially if the cake is being eaten by children.

Shamitha Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 6:29am
post #7 of 17

Hi. I simply push the wires into a ball of fondant and place it on top of the cake.You could check out my dolphin cake.Hope this helps

Briarview Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 6:40am
post #8 of 17

Yes I agree with franjmc plastic drinking straws or flower picks. I never put wire into cakes.

aine2 Posted 2 Mar 2007 , 12:53pm
post #9 of 17

It's against health and safety rules here too for wires to be inserted directly into the cake. I use a posy pic which I insert a little bit of oasis fix into. The looks like chewing gum and is very strong. Once it is inserted into the pic, your wires can be pushed into this and they will not move. It's brilliant stuff for this very purpose and if you look on Lindy Smith's website you will find all you are looking for.

Cheers! thumbs_up.gif

Sparklepop Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 8:54am
post #10 of 17

I always use a plastic flower pick and fill it with royal icing or fondant this gives me time to fiddle with the hearts so they look just right once set they don't move.

mareg Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 3:34pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

bare wire NOT a good idea

insert plastic straws or coffee stirrers first and then put wire in that.

use only UNpainted, UNwrapped wire....best is to find stainless steel.

wash thoroughly and sanitize before using.




Doug, do you cover the end of the wire you put in the straw? I'm planning on using wire for a cake in May and don't want my "flying" Zero dog falling down. icon_smile.gif

Thanks! thumbs_up.gif

Doug Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 4:27pm
post #12 of 17

push straw/stirrer all the way down to the cakeboard -- wire no touch cake.

other than that no special treatment

mareg Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 4:53pm
post #13 of 17

cool! Thanks a bunch!

MelZ Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 8:16pm
post #14 of 17

I use a flower pick with a little MMF inside to stablize the wires on some designs or a ball of MMF with the wires inserted into that if I am going to make some type of a cake topper.

Kyleen Posted 3 Mar 2007 , 10:00pm
post #15 of 17

I use a fresh floral pick. I stick it into a piece of styrofoam to hold it still. Put mmf in the pick and arange my wire topper. I trasport the topper in the styrofoam to keep it from breaking and assemble once I get to the venue. icon_razz.gif

fondantslinger Posted 15 Feb 2016 , 3:30pm
post #16 of 17

I have used wires many a time & I like Fairytale use cloth covered wire tape,  I also use thin taffy sticks (you get for making candy lollipops) & also those long wooden skewers (come in many sizes & thickness) the kind you use for BBQ kabobs.  The only problem with anything not wired is nothing bends so you don't get that life form reality look - my go to most of the time is cloth covered wired tape for that bendability.

And I have never had anyone cut my cakes (we don't provide that service) with wired flowers still in the cake.  I always give instructions to the caterer or family member or whomever is doing the cutting to REMOVE all the embellishments first & it has 'never' been a problem (mine are mostly handmade sugar pieces & the bride usually wants them afterwards).  I leave written instructions with diagrams & also I stay to give verbal instructions the same as written on paper to the venue staff person/or the caterer so they understand how it's done (my clients always get a copy as well on this besides their contract & anything else that connects in some way with my cakes (waterfalls, stands & pillars etc)   You can never be too sure of what other people will do without explicit instructions if your not there to so-call babysit them thru it.


DeniseNH Posted 15 Feb 2016 , 4:34pm
post #17 of 17

Me too, cloth covered wires for just one single item.  When grouping wires for flowers, wrap the grouping in florist tape then insert.


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