Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Buttercream

Decorating By Jackie Updated 26 May 2016 , 8:00pm by gfbaby

kazita Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 9:18pm
post #601 of 708

AI thought margarine has a higher water content so it isn't as good as butter. Just what I thought.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 9:27pm
post #602 of 708

A

Original message sent by kazita

I thought margarine has a higher water content so it isn't as good as butter. Just what I thought.

The margarine we use (Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks) has the same water content as butter (20%).

liyana Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 9:36pm
post #603 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


The margarine we use (Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks) has the same water content as butter (20%).

wow there is such thing! but I am currently in Moscow, and I doubt there is such kind here... unfortunately :(

kazita Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 9:40pm
post #604 of 708

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

The margarine we use (Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks) has the same water content as butter (20%).

but do most margarine contain more water than butter? There has to be a difference between butter and margarine.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 9:51pm
post #605 of 708

A

Original message sent by kazita

but do most margarine contain more water than butter? There has to be a difference between butter and margarine.

Water content should be roughly equivalent for butter and margarine in stick form. "Light" margarine or margarine spreads in tubs will have higher water content.

kazita Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 10:02pm
post #606 of 708

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

Water content should be roughly equivalent for butter and margarine in stick form. "Light" margarine or margarine spreads in tubs will have higher water content.

Ok so I'm asking what is the difference between butter and margarine in the stick form? There has to be a difference or they would be the same price in the store.

jason_kraft Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 10:18pm
post #607 of 708

A

Original message sent by kazita

Ok so I'm asking what is the difference between butter and margarine in the stick form? There has to be a difference or they would be the same price in the store.

There should be no significant difference in water content since margarine sticks are usually meant for baking. Any price difference will be due to differences in cost from ingredients and/or the manufacturing process itself.

BlueSheepBakeShop Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 10:21pm
post #608 of 708

If you're using american buttercream and getting bubbles one trick we use is to use the whip attachment and mix on low speed for 10 minutes. smooth as silk!
 

kazita Posted 29 Apr 2013 , 10:38pm
post #609 of 708

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

There should be no significant difference in water content since margarine sticks are usually meant for baking. Any price difference will be due to differences in cost from ingredients and/or the manufacturing process itself.

There's the answer I was looking for better ingredients. ...not like any of this matters in my peticular buttercream mines made with all high ratio shortening.

BakingIrene Posted 30 Apr 2013 , 12:22am
post #610 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazita 


Ok so I'm asking what is the difference between butter and margarine in the stick form? There has to be a difference or they would be the same price in the store.

Butter comes from a cow.

 

Margarine is made from plant oils.

 

That is why the prices are different.

 

They are formulated with the same water content (give or take a %) so that you can substitute them 1 for 1 in most recipes.  Including icing.

kazita Posted 30 Apr 2013 , 1:00am
post #611 of 708

A

Original message sent by BakingIrene

Butter comes from a cow.

Margarine is made from plant oils.

That is why the prices are different.

They are formulated with the same water content (give or take a %) so that you can substitute them 1 for 1 in most recipes.  Including icing.

Why doesn't everyone who uses real butter in their icing just use margarine if they are so much alike ? Or is it like Anna says because Butter is the boss. Is it a comparison like gross greasy crisco to high ratio shortening?..the last question is a rhetorical question.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Apr 2013 , 2:56am
post #612 of 708

A

Original message sent by kazita

Why doesn't everyone who uses real butter in their icing just use margarine if they are so much alike ? Or is it like Anna says because Butter is the boss. Is it a comparison like gross greasy crisco to high ratio shortening?..the last question is a rhetorical question.

I think it's partially that people are just used to using butter; that's what they know so that's what they use. Margarine also has a negative stigma to some, so even though a margarine-based BC recipe may be equivalent or superior, they will stick to butter so they can advertise that they use "real butter".

Annabakescakes Posted 30 Apr 2013 , 4:54pm
post #613 of 708

A

Original message sent by kazita

[quote name="BakingIrene" url="/t/1353/everything-you-ever-wanted-to-know-about-buttercream/600#post_7388677"]Butter comes from a cow.

Margarine is made from plant oils.

That is why the prices are different.

They are formulated with the same water content (give or take a %) so that you can substitute them 1 for 1 in most recipes.  Including icing.

Why doesn't everyone who uses real butter in their icing just use margarine if they are so much alike ? Or is it like Anna says because Butter is the boss. Is it a comparison like gross greasy crisco to high ratio shortening?..the last question is a rhetorical question.[/quote]

That is exactly it. Crisco vs hi-ratio or margarine bs butter. For icing especially, margarine is a very poor substitute. Maybe it works almost or as well as butter, but for the taste alone, butter is boss. I do use it to give a better flavor to my non dairy icing, but that is the only time it ever steps foot in my bakery. I go through quite a bit of margarine in the house though. It goes on my toast, or grilled cheese, in my vegetables and potatoes, but I use butter for sauces, and when making pastries it is butter or lard. They all have their place, and stay in their place, at my household and bakery.

SugaredSaffron Posted 1 May 2013 , 3:42am
post #614 of 708

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

I think it's partially that people are just used to using butter; that's what they know so that's what they use. Margarine also has a negative stigma to some, so even though a margarine-based BC recipe may be equivalent or superior, they will stick to butter so they can advertise that they use "real butter".

It's not because people are used to using butter, it's a superior product to margarine :/ Margarine is coloured and flavoured to imitate butter. They are usually salted and margarine icings are usually also softer at room temperature. Butter is churned from cream, margarine is made in a freaky lab.

jason_kraft Posted 1 May 2013 , 5:16am
post #615 of 708

A

Original message sent by SugaredSaffron

It's not because people are used to using butter, it's a superior product to margarine :/ Margarine is coloured and flavoured to imitate butter. They are usually salted and margarine icings are usually also softer at room temperature. Butter is churned from cream, margarine is made in a freaky lab.

The fact that butter and margarine are processed in different ways does not necessarily make one superior to the other, they both have their place. I'm not sure how the relative freakiness of the manufacturing facility is relevant, or how you would quantify that.

In our experience (and in the experience of our customers) the margarine-based BC recipe we use produced superior results to butter-based BC, but that does not mean margarine is always superior to butter, just that our margarine-based BC recipe was superior to the butter BC recipe (which was still pretty good).

We did not have any issues with temperature sensitivity in our BC until we switched out shortening component from Sweetex to Sweetex Z (which has zero trans fats), so if that is a concern and you cannot use shortening with trans fats you might be better off using butter.

SugaredSaffron Posted 1 May 2013 , 9:43am
post #616 of 708

I agree both have their place, if you need a non dairy buttercream then there are some pretty tasty margerines on the market. I just disagree that people use butter because they are used to it, they use it for many other reasons, the most important one is that butter is better in taste, consistency etc.

When it comes to food, I think freakiness is pretty important. I like my food, or at least what I sell as food, to be pretty low on the freakiness scale.

zamora-short Posted 1 May 2013 , 7:05pm
post #617 of 708

Awesome....can you do that AFTER you whip it or do you have to keep it slow through the whole mixing process from beginning to end?

Carrie789 Posted 1 May 2013 , 11:59pm
post #618 of 708

Is there really a good tasting and easy-to-use fondant recipe out there? I don't like marshmallows so maybe that's the problem. I have tried many recipes that claim to taste good. While they may not be as nasty as Wilton, they have never risen to the level of "good" in my opinion.

Annabakescakes Posted 2 May 2013 , 5:43pm
post #619 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie789 

Is there really a good tasting and easy-to-use fondant recipe out there? I don't like marshmallows so maybe that's the problem. I have tried many recipes that claim to taste good. While they may not be as nasty as Wilton, they have never risen to the level of "good" in my opinion.

You should start a new thread for this question, as it is really off-topic. But do a search for Michelle Foster's Fondant. I use it exclusively, and love the taste, though I do add more vanilla.

Annabakescakes Posted 2 May 2013 , 5:44pm
post #620 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredSaffron 

I agree both have their place, if you need a non dairy buttercream then there are some pretty tasty margerines on the market. I just disagree that people use butter because they are used to it, they use it for many other reasons, the most important one is that butter is better in taste, consistency etc.

When it comes to food, I think freakiness is pretty important. I like my food, or at least what I sell as food, to be pretty low on the freakiness scale.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredSaffron 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 

I think it's partially that people are just used to using butter; that's what they know so that's what they use. Margarine also has a negative stigma to some, so even though a margarine-based BC recipe may be equivalent or superior, they will stick to butter so they can advertise that they use "real butter".

It's not because people are used to using butter, it's a superior product to margarine :/ Margarine is coloured and flavoured to imitate butter. They are usually salted and margarine icings are usually also softer at room temperature. Butter is churned from cream, margarine is made in a freaky lab.

Yeah, lol.

Carrie789 Posted 2 May 2013 , 6:40pm
post #621 of 708

Oops! Thanks Anna. I should never post when exhausted.
 

Marielijah Posted 21 May 2013 , 9:44pm
post #622 of 708

The LorAnn oils look like they are made for flavoring candy.  Can you use them for flavoring buttercream as well?

Carrie789 Posted 23 May 2013 , 3:22am
post #623 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie 




Here is the link to the article explaining that technique:
http://cakecentral.com/article10-How-To-Create-Faux-Fondant.html


This link no longer works, and I need all the help I can get. I want buttercream that smooths and stay where I put it.

kazita Posted 23 May 2013 , 3:28am
post #624 of 708

A

Original message sent by Carrie789

This link no longer works, and I need all the help I can get. I want buttercream that smooths and stay where I put it.

Are you crumb coating your cake? Try thinning your icing some to see if it spreads easier and stays in place.

Carrie789 Posted 23 May 2013 , 7:57pm
post #625 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazita 


Are you crumb coating your cake? Try thinning your icing some to see if it spreads easier and stays in place.


Yes, I always crumb coat. My latest frustration--One minute I was merrily using the bench scraper to smooth the sides, and everything looked like the tutorials, the next minute it became so dry it started peeling up. Maybe I am just too slow. I used the Viva towel to smooth, and it looked pretty good. Then, after sitting for an hour in the frige, it bulged at the bottom and some at the top. I was using Edna's Crusting Cream Cheese Buttercream. I don't know if I thinned it too much or not enough.

kazita Posted 23 May 2013 , 8:15pm
post #626 of 708

AI've never used that kind of buttercream but if its coming up off the cake like that I'm thinking it needs to be thinned more so its easier to spread. As far as the bulging goes I'm gonna post a link on here to a thread about how to stop bulging from happening. Hopefully this helps if not let me know and ill try to help you more.

cakecentral.com/t/633571/my-newest-trick

Carrie789 Posted 24 May 2013 , 5:05pm
post #627 of 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazita 

I've never used that kind of buttercream but if its coming up off the cake like that I'm thinking it needs to be thinned more so its easier to spread. As far as the bulging goes I'm gonna post a link on here to a thread about how to stop bulging from happening. Hopefully this helps if not let me know and ill try to help you more.

cakecentral.com/t/633571/my-newest-trick


Ah, so maybe I didn't smoosh the cake enough? I will try this--and thinning the icing.Thank you so much for your help. Will let you know how it turns out.

Alandrascakes Posted 27 May 2013 , 6:39pm
post #628 of 708

AI really need help with BC! How do I make it thicker so it won't melt so fast. The humidity is killing my cakes! !!!! HELP! !!!!!!!!!!

shalinip Posted 29 May 2013 , 9:17pm
post #629 of 708

the link does not work Jackie :(

mjd65 Posted 3 Jun 2013 , 12:05am
post #630 of 708

Great topic, I never get enough answers on how to make BC.  I use water which works as good as milk, the difference is that is you are not using the BC right away use water. 

On the other hand I'm sure LorAnn has great flavors but I personally like natural/fresh ones.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%