Soaking Syrups

Decorating By chyna Updated 30 Mar 2016 , 4:30pm by MariaPN

chyna Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 6:20pm
post #1 of 23

tell me more about using soaking syrups on scratch cakes, please.

How do I make the syrup? How do I apply/use it? What does it do to the cake structure/texture? Can I use it just to soften a crust?

22 replies
chyna Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 6:25pm
post #2 of 23

ok, I found a thread on syrup that cleared up some of my questions. can I use it on a crust?
how will it affect fondant?

Cakepro Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 8:33pm
post #3 of 23

Sure you can use it on the crust. You just don't want to soak the cake into sogginess. You just want to use enough to add moisture, not actually soak it.

Assuming you're going to put anywhere from a thin (crumbcoat) to a regular layer of buttercream on your cake, the fondant will be unaffected by the syrup. icon_smile.gif

MariaLovesCakes Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 8:46pm
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by chyna

tell me more about using soaking syrups on scratch cakes, please.

How do I make the syrup? How do I apply/use it? What does it do to the cake structure/texture? Can I use it just to soften a crust?




Click on this link http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-10274-soaking.html+syrup

I gave a brief description on how to make and posted pictures to show...

chyna Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 9:40pm
post #5 of 23

is that teaspoons in your chart?

MariaLovesCakes Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 10:21pm
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by chyna

is that teaspoons in your chart?




Edit to correct myself.

No, Actually since this chart was from the Spanish forum the "t" actually stands for cup. So if it says: 1 1/2 t it is for 1 1/2 cups. I am sorry, I didn't realize that she had put it that way.. icon_redface.gif

chyna Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 10:27pm
post #7 of 23

whew, ok, that makes MUCH more sense...I couldn't figure out how it would work with either tsp or Tbsp....LOL!

Thanks!

janethorp Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 10:30pm
post #8 of 23

Just recently I got brave and add cherry flavored syrup that my kids use on their snow cones with a red velvet cake. I like things premade... so that was sitting around. Wow what flavor. I was also thinking of adding the syrups they use in coffees these days. Non - alcohol is the way I need to go for my family.

MariaLovesCakes Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 10:34pm
post #9 of 23

I have literally changed the flavors of a basic cake yellow by soaking them with the syrup.

For example: when you make the syrup you can add any flavor extrac:

Lemon
Orange
Pineapple

etc...

cuillere Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 10:56pm
post #10 of 23

I can't say enough about syrups, i find it very strange that they are not used a lot in the US, it's standard in French pastries and European cakes. I got to a point where i don't even measure my syrups i pour some water add corn syrup and any liqueur or flavoring or jus even and voila. I use a spray bottle to get an even soak. the good thing about syrups is that you can make a cake and add a complimentary flavor which translates to fancy and exotic. I made a butter cake and soaked it with caramel liqueur syrup but when i say it's a butter cake soaked in caramel liqueur people get impressed! it does add a lot to the cake.

bubblezmom Posted 5 Dec 2005 , 11:23pm
post #11 of 23

Real bakers do still use the syrups. I know b/c the baker for my wedding cake drowned the cake in a pineapple syrup. It was so good, even the thick bottom layer was moist all the way thru 4 days after it was baked. It made a great morning-after breakfast for the family. icon_smile.gif

vitade Posted 6 Dec 2005 , 10:40am
post #12 of 23

When do you put it on? When the cake is warm or before frosting or? I wanted to try this once but wasn't sure.

MariaLovesCakes Posted 6 Dec 2005 , 1:09pm
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuillere

I can't say enough about syrups, i find it very strange that they are not used a lot in the US, it's standard in French pastries and European cakes. I got to a point where i don't even measure my syrups i pour some water add corn syrup and any liqueur or flavoring or jus even and voila. I use a spray bottle to get an even soak. the good thing about syrups is that you can make a cake and add a complimentary flavor which translates to fancy and exotic. I made a butter cake and soaked it with caramel liqueur syrup but when i say it's a butter cake soaked in caramel liqueur people get impressed! it does add a lot to the cake.




It is a standard practice in Puerto Rico as well. The people I have talked to there rarely do cake mix cakes... So, the clients are used to scratch cakes soaked in syrup.. They do it for birthdays as well as weddings... For the weddings they just use more exotic mixes for syrup like adding liquors.

Like you, I eyeball it when I am soaking the cake. I soak it to how moist I wanted or the customer. I had a lady that wanted "really" moist, so I added more syrup than usual. Others like less, so I adjust it. So, I don't follow a strict measurement to soak cakes.

The chart I posted however its good as a guide.

MariaLovesCakes Posted 6 Dec 2005 , 1:13pm
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitade

When do you put it on? When the cake is warm or before frosting or? I wanted to try this once but wasn't sure.




I've heard a couple of different answers.

The way I learned, by a professional baker which book I follow on all my recipes, is to soak the cake after it has been completely cooled. The syrup can be added when its warm or cold, but not when its hot. She said that it could ferment, especially if you are using flavors like pineapple and lemon.

So, you can wait for the cake to be completely cooled, if you are torting it, tort it, wet the first layer, fill it with whatever filling you chose, put the next layer on top and then wet just like the first.

After you have soaked a cake, don't try to pick up. It will break up because is now wet and not as firm.

vitade Posted 6 Dec 2005 , 1:41pm
post #15 of 23

uw, glad you mentioned not moving it after it's been soaked. I was going to try and do it before I even had it on my board! Good point

cuillere Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 6:51pm
post #16 of 23

Marialoves cakes
You and I find ourselves answering every single syrup question...looool, are you a soaker like me hehehehehehehe!!!!
Just as Marialoves cakes mentioned before, I follow the same steps. I m sorry Ive been doing it for so long I don't pay attention to the steps anymore.

gegon Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 7:08pm
post #17 of 23

I was shocked to see that the people in US don't soak their cakes...It is a standard procedure in Puerto Rico. Just to give you an idea, I couldn't sell one cake if it did not have the syrup in it.

People actually come to you and ask what flavor syrup will I use. They assume I'm using it and I actually always do because it is part of the basics in cake baking.

The only difference in my technique from the ones I've seen here is that I don't tort the cake at all. Here in PR we don't really tort cakes unless the client asks, we just soak and frost and decorate.

chaptlps Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 7:19pm
post #18 of 23

I have a question: How about using the flavoured coffee creamers? Has anyone done that and how did it turn out?

MariaLovesCakes Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 8:38pm
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by gegon

The only difference in my technique from the ones I've seen here is that I don't tort the cake at all. Here in PR we don't really tort cakes unless the client asks, we just soak and frost and decorate.




This is what I found too. I learned how to decorate cakes here in the US, but using Puerto Rican cake recipes. I knew how to catered to the people from Puerto Rico because I ate those kinds of cakes as well.

However, I did notice that there is no torting and filling for the cakes. I even have a lady that orders cakes from time to time and asked me not to fill the cake. Just to soak it in the syrup and ice it!

I have even gone to weddings and celebrations alike and they don't fill the cakes either.

CakemanOH Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 8:43pm
post #20 of 23

I make a cake where i soak it with a 3 milk mixture. It is unbelivable.

tinabee Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 10:29pm
post #21 of 23

Should you not use syrups on cake made from a box mix?

bubblezmom Posted 7 Dec 2005 , 11:57pm
post #22 of 23

You could make a thick syrup to add flavor, but I would not soak a cakemix cake. It would just get mushy.

I'm a child of the 70's and everyone poured flavored glazes over cakemix bundt cakes or poked holes in the cakes and poured glaze over them. This method will add flavor to a cakemix cake without ruining it.

MariaPN Posted 30 Mar 2016 , 4:30pm
post #23 of 23

I love soaked cakes for the moisture they add.  My one suggestion is to use a denser cake so that it doesn't fall apart.  You can mist the cake or, for a really moist texture, poke holes in it with a skewer or chopstick and pour the glaze or syrup over.  I did this recently by pouring a rose-orange syrup over a fenugreek cake from the cookbook "Jerusalem" and it was unbelievable!

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