peanut2 Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 12:16am
post #1 of

I've been looking at those bevelled cake pans, because they make such beautiful shaped cakes. But do they give enough height? With the regular pans I just use two pans per layer usually, but how would it work with the bevelled pans?

22 replies
SquirrellyCakes Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 12:55am
post #2 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by peanut2

I've been looking at those bevelled cake pans, because they make such beautiful shaped cakes. But do they give enough height? With the regular pans I just use two pans per layer usually, but how would it work with the bevelled pans?



I think most people don't really understand how these work until they own them or know someone that has them.
You would use the regular round cake pan and the bevelled cake pan to do each layer.
Hugs Squirrelly

peanut2 Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 1:27am
post #3 of

Ohhhh...that makes sense.
But I think the ones I saw came in odd number sizes (like 9") and my pans are even sizes.

SquirrellyCakes Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 1:52am
post #4 of

Wilton discontinued theirs, but they were in even sizes and you likely could find them on E-bay.
Hugs Squirrelly

peanut2 Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 1:57am
post #5 of

Good idea, I hadn't thought of ebay.

cakefairy18 Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 4:30am
post #6 of

what is a bevelled cake pan?

SquirrellyCakes Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 4:37am
post #7 of

It is a pan that is flat on the bottom and has sort of angled sides and it is usually used for Lambeth style cakes.
Hugs Squirrelly

Cakepro Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 6:34pm
post #8 of

I don't think Squirrelly and peanut are on the same page.

The contour pans made by Wilton were in odd sizes (I have the set, plus I own every yearbook so I double-checked icon_smile.gif). They still make the 9" contour pan if you're interested but finding the set may be a little more difficult.

Honestly, it's very easy to just hold your serrated knife at a 45 degree angle and remove the top edge of the cake in order to create your own contoured edge. The set isn't really all that great, I just bought it because as a WMI I got a discount on it. I think in 8 years of doing cakes, I've used them once.

Cakepro Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 6:37pm
post #9 of

Looks like you can still buy them, albeit not the Wilton brand, and they do come in even sizes:

http://www.sugarcraft.com/catalog/pans/beveled-contour.htm

The "Konture Kake Pan" 7-pan set looks like a good investment if you really want the pans.

peanut2 Posted 27 Nov 2005 , 9:38pm

Cakepro..that's exactly what I'm looking for! Thanks!

SquirrellyCakes Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 2:44am

Cakepro, I am going with the sizes stated in Wilton Wedding Dreams 200, pg. 98 where they state the top bevels are 8, 10 and 12 inch and bottom bevels of 14 and 16. Not sure if you are referring to older Wilton bevel pans or what.
Hugs Squirrelly

Cakepro Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 3:32am

Otay. We were just talking about different things...you were referring to beveled pans but peanut was looking for contoured pans. I forgot that Wilton made those beveled pans, but crazily enough, when I googled "beveled cake pans" I got lots of hits for contoured cake pans. Go figure! icon_lol.gif

peanut2 Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 3:45am

Oh, I hate to ask...what exactly is the difference between bevelled pans and contoured pans? I have an idea...but I want to be sure.

SquirrellyCakes Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 3:53am
Quote:
Originally Posted by peanut2

I've been looking at those bevelled cake pans, because they make such beautiful shaped cakes. But do they give enough height? With the regular pans I just use two pans per layer usually, but how would it work with the bevelled pans?



Ok Cake Pro and Peanut, now I am confused, haha. Her first post was about bevelled pans, not contours, did I miss something, haha, these are two totally different kinds of pans. Are you gals trying to make me think I have lost my mind, haha!
Hugs Squirrelly

peanut2 Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 3:59am

I didn't realize they were two different types!

Cakepro Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 3:59am

Contoured pans have a gently beveled, rolled edge whereas beveled pans have a rather severe angle to their top edge. Here's a link to a picture of a beveled pan for Lambeth-style cakes, as Squirrely was talking about: Linky.

peanut2 Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:01am

Oh, thanks Cakepro. I'll have to try to figure out what I want to get.

SquirrellyCakes Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:02am

Heehee, no messing with the squirrel now, haha! Yes, bevelled are difficult to find in a search likely because contours are so popular for fondant and Lambeth work was becoming a lost art for awhile, but it is making a comeback!
Hugs Squirrelly

chaptlps Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:04am

k call me stoopid but what the heck is "lambeth work"?

Cakepro Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:08am

The only reason I thought you might be talking about contoured cake pans was the odd sizes you mentioned. Plus I always call the contour pans 'beveled.' icon_biggrin.gif Dunno why!

Cakepro Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:10am

Lambeth-style cakes employ lots and lots of overpiping. They are very elaborate, highly decorated, busy cakes. icon_biggrin.gif I'll try to google some pics for you.

Cakepro Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 4:15am

http://www.winbeckler.com/sculptures4.asp#Lambeth%20Grooms%20Cake

Per Baking911, "Lambeth Style Cake: This style of cake decorating is named after Joseph Lambeth of England, a prominent decorator circa 1920-1930. This style uses stacking layer after layer of Rolled Fondant Icing on one another, to achieve its unique look. On tops of all of the layers, Royal Icing is piped. Beveled top and bottom edges are another characteristic of this style of cake decorating."

It's not very popular so there aren't many links or images available, at least not using the search terms "Lambeth" and "Lambeth-style cakes."

peanut2 Posted 28 Nov 2005 , 1:40pm

Hmmm...I like both pan styles. This decision isn't going to be easy.

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