Torte - What Is It And Why Do It

Decorating By midwestmom Updated 28 Jul 2013 , 6:02pm by BatterUpCake

midwestmom Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 6:55pm
post #1 of 42

I see it mentioned all the time here. torting. It's to cut the cake in half & ice it back together, is that right? I'd love to know more about it and why you do it. I'm awaiting some new cake decorating books in the mail & I'm hoping they'll explain some basics like to me. But I've just baked a heart shaped cake & I'm wondering if I should 'torte' it & use choc icing in the layers. (choc cake).

41 replies
vdrsolo Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 7:08pm
post #2 of 42

It makes it look prettier when cut on the plate.

Also, some peoplet thinks it makes the cake more stable because instead of putting one layer of thicker filling, you have 3 layers of thin filling, less risk of bulging and sliding

JoAnnB Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 7:17pm
post #3 of 42

Torting can also allow for a moist filling, like jams or curds. this can save a dry cake. Many decorators do not torte layers. Using solid layers can save time, and help taller cakes be more stable.

Crimsicle Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 7:51pm
post #4 of 42

I only torte on request. I detest doing it, and IMHO, it makes the cake LESS stable. More slipping and sliding of layers.

DiscoLady Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 7:56pm
post #5 of 42

I dont' torte I stack two layers together with filling in between...never had a problem with sliding. My cakes are taller as a result...

Sugarbunz Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:10pm
post #6 of 42

I'm glad I saw this post. I've wondered the same thing; I've been terrified to even try "torting". I do have a small heart cake (6") that I might try it with tonight just because I want to get SOME filling in the middle without making it as high as two hearts stacked on eachother.

vdrsolo Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:14pm
post #7 of 42

I normally don't torte unless my filling is fragile.

For example, for a regular stiff buttercream filling, I don't torte.

But when I do fillings with jam or mousse, I find the cake to be too "slippy" to get a good filling layer just between the two cakes, that is when I torte, so I can put just a light layer in those layers

parismom Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:18pm
post #8 of 42

I torte almost all of mine. I don't like how it looks cut when it's in just one layer and usually I don't need to feed so many that I need to stack two cakes. That's why I do it.

nglez09 Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:29pm
post #9 of 42

Do you guys see a difference in torting vs. stacking two rounds on top of each other w/ filling in between?

JoAnnB Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:32pm
post #10 of 42

Yes, for all the reasons listed above.

Taller finished cake
more filling
moisture
pretty cut servings

cordy Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:32pm
post #11 of 42

I torte all my cakes. Ideally I try and put a layer of filling every half inch, it looks lovely when cut and allows for filling in every bite icon_smile.gif It seems to help with bulging filling because the layers aren't so heavy as to smoosh the filling out the sides. I also never have any sliding issues when I torte many layers, and almost all my cakes have to travel in a car somewhere.

HollyPJ Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 8:36pm
post #12 of 42

My standard operation for a round cake is to use 2 2-inch rounds and torte each, creating four layers of cake and three layers of filling. I generally don't use buttercream as a cake filling. Instead, I use mousse, cream cheese fillings, or flavored whipped creams. I love the extra dessertishness (sure, that's a word! lol) these types of fillings give the cakes. I don't put a huge amount of filling in (wouldn't want it to completely overpower the cake), but there's enough that you can definitely taste it.

It's fussy and time-consuming, but I like the results.

DiscoLady Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 9:16pm
post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by nglez09

Do you guys see a difference in torting vs. stacking two rounds on top of each other w/ filling in between?




I don't have much of a sweet tooth so when I eat a piece of cake I like to taste cake and very little filling (I also take the center slice with little icing too). I once went to a baby shower where the cake weighed a ton; I soon found out why. When they sliced the cake it had like three layers of a pudding filling that totally overwhelmed the cake. It literally oozed out of the cake after it was cut and the slices were just this icky and goopy bloppy BLEECH mess. People say they love my cakes because they are not too sweet and moist, I think it's because of the way I stack and fill them with just a thin layer of filling.
But of course there will be those who love sweets and won't mind all the sweet filling...makes my teeth hurt just thinking about it icon_biggrin.gif

HollyPJ Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 9:24pm
post #14 of 42

I try to avoid making my fillings ultra sweet. That's why I don't fill with buttercream usually.
That pudding sounds like too much!
I make a lemon cream cheese filling that compliments many cake flavors well--it's sweet, but the tartness of the lemon keeps it from being sickening.

I checked out Sylvia Weinstock's book, Sweet Celebrations, a few times. She has diagrams in it of her torted and filled cakes. There's as much filling as cake! That's overkill, IMO. I wonder how the cakes taste...

mjs4492 Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 9:29pm
post #15 of 42

I generally use 3" pans and only cut in half and fill. On smaller cakes, 5 x 2 and 6 x 2, I still only cut once and fill.
Gonna have to try 3 layers with the 3" pans. thumbs_up.gif

cordy Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 9:33pm
post #16 of 42

I avoid the sweet filling. I like to use lemon curd with the white almond sour cream cake YUM. I filled a recent cake with white chocolate flavored pudding and that alone wasn't too sweet, it was actually pretty yummy, but I added a dash of raspberry extract and that gave it a tart little kick that was perfect compliment to the chocolate sour cream cake

redpanda Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 9:43pm
post #17 of 42

Last weekend, I torted a tall 9X13 and added preserves--1/2 had raspberry with a little almond extract, and the other 1/2 had apricot with a little lemon juice.

I don't like my desserts overly sweet, and having a thin layer of something sweet-tart seems to work well.

My general procedure is that I do two 2" thick layers when using buttercream or custard filling, without torting. When using preserves or ganache filling, I torte, so that each layer is about an inch.

RedPanda

nglez09 Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 10:18pm
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnnB

Yes, for all the reasons listed above.

Taller finished cake
more filling
moisture
pretty cut servings




But is there really a difference construction-wise? And won't the servings look the same either way?

cordy Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 10:31pm
post #19 of 42

Ok hopefully this will work, I did a seach here on CC for "slice of cake" and found this pic.
LL

cordy Posted 13 Feb 2007 , 10:33pm
post #20 of 42

See theabove picture? There are very thin layers of cake and filling rather than two inches of cake then filling then another two inches of cake....

nglez09 Posted 14 Feb 2007 , 10:13pm
post #21 of 42

Oh okay. If you make each layer 1" and don't torte, will it pretty much still be the same?

vdrsolo Posted 14 Feb 2007 , 10:17pm
post #22 of 42

wouldn't it just be easier to make a 2" and torte it?

FuturamaFanatic Posted 14 Feb 2007 , 10:33pm
post #23 of 42

If you bake 2" and torte then you're using 1/2 the amount of pans verses baking 4, one inch cakes.
I always torte. Even if I just put a very thin layer of filling (I too try to avoid plain buttercream and perfer jams, whipped creams, cream cheese and fresh fruit) it looks very nice when cut and placed on a plate. Much nicer than two thick pieces of cake and little filling.

katy625 Posted 14 Feb 2007 , 11:53pm
post #24 of 42

I always torte my cakes. I always have a sweet tooth so i enjoy all the fillings!!!!! That and i LOVE the height.

UGoCakes Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 12:14am
post #25 of 42

I too ALWAYS torte for same reasons as everyone else. Love the look and love adding fun flavors and filling to the plain cake. I have also found that when using BC as the filling the cake is very sturdy if refridgerated before transport. (because the BC becomes firm)

PistachioCranberry Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 12:31am
post #26 of 42

Has anyone ever torted a cake larger than 8" such as lets say 16"? Would it have to be torted then partially frozen to lift one layer?

Doug Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 12:35am
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by da757deevalibra

Has anyone ever torted a cake larger than 8" such as lets say 16"?




yep

and big sheet cakes too....

what can I say -- filling junkie!

Quote:
Originally Posted by da757deevalibra

Would it have to be torted then partially frozen to lift one layer?




nope, I use a BIG cookie sheet dusted w/ powdered sugar (gotta keep it sweet!) and slid it in under the top layer and lift it off. then slide it right back on after filling.

PistachioCranberry Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 12:40am
post #28 of 42

Thank you Doug I wanted to torte one for a cake I have next week and was wondering about that because I didnt want to break the cake.

indydebi Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 12:48am
post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by da757deevalibra

Has anyone ever torted a cake larger than 8" such as lets say 16"? Would it have to be torted then partially frozen to lift one layer?




Yep! In my photos, the Strawberry Shortcake is torted. 14", 12" and 8". I have a pic of one of the pieces, showing how pretty it looks with white cake and strawberry glaze filling, and I will post it as soon as it's scanned. I use a cardboard the same size as the cake to slide each torted layer onto the cake. It's (as we say in the trade) "a piece of cake!" thumbs_up.gif

I don't normally tort my weddings, but I do like the look when it's cut. It's a great option when you have a bride and groom who can't decide on what fillings they want. I can settle it with "ok....we can do both" with a torted layer.

midwestmom Posted 15 Feb 2007 , 4:55pm
post #30 of 42

Thanks for all the replies. I'm going to have to give this a try. icon_smile.gif

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