Any Advice On Pouring Ganache?

Decorating By msmanning2 Updated 19 May 2009 , 6:38pm by SweetSuzie

msmanning2 Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 3:57am
post #1 of 24

I finally have a cake this weekend that I can try this technique. I have been dying to try it. Any tips, tricks or techniques on pouring the ganache to cover the entire cake? (10 inch square) I am using the cheftaz (I believe) recipe from this site. Thanks as always!

Michele

23 replies
Candy120 Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 4:48am
post #2 of 24

I was wondering the same thing...here's a bump!!

ang_ty95 Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 4:55am
post #3 of 24

Funny enough I just made ganache tonight for the purpose of dipping strawberries but afterwards I had a lot of left over so I poured it over some cupcakes that I had.

I found the trick to get it pourable was to beat it on med-high speed for about 10 minutes. Then you get the consistency you need and pouring is simple right from the mixing bowl.

Chef_Stef Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 5:16am
post #4 of 24

I only tried it once, and I did learn this:

Cold cakes out of the fridge to not marry well with warm ganache. It seemed to stop flowing too quickly. It did cover the whole cake but sort of immediately wanted to "set" up, and I couldn't spread it because it was cooling too quickly, if that makes sense.

On a room temp cake, probably whole different story. It sure tasted awsome though! wow Choc fudge cake with cherries and whipped cream inside, ganache outside.... thumbs_up.gif

doc_farms Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 5:24am
post #5 of 24
ang_ty95 Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 5:24am
post #6 of 24

Here's a picture of the ganache that I used for the dipped strawberries. Unfortunately the cake was eaten out very quickly so I could not get a picture.
LL

Delicate-Lee Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 9:16am
post #7 of 24

I was taught that to get a nice even cover, is to pour it in in the middle of the cake and keep it there untill the ganache covers the whole cake... If you put it on a cooling rack with a tray under it, you will save all the excess and can use it again.... thumbs_up.gif

msmanning2 Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 1:12pm
post #8 of 24

thank you everyone!!! I can't wait to try it today. I will let you know how it goes!

mcalhoun Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 1:37pm
post #9 of 24

Do you just use less if you only want it to run down the sides a bit?
Melissa

rezzygirl Posted 8 Feb 2007 , 2:47pm
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by homecook

I only tried it once, and I did learn this:

Cold cakes out of the fridge to not marry well with warm ganache. It seemed to stop flowing too quickly. It did cover the whole cake but sort of immediately wanted to "set" up, and I couldn't spread it because it was cooling too quickly, if that makes sense.

On a room temp cake, probably whole different story. It sure tasted awsome though! wow Choc fudge cake with cherries and whipped cream inside, ganache outside.... thumbs_up.gif




A trick that I use: after it has set up, take an offset spatula, heat it over a stove burner or candle until HOT, and smooth over the ganache. Keep a damp towel/paper towel to clean the spatula after each swipe if necessary. It gives it a nice glossy finish and you can patch any bumps in the ganache easily.

-Rezzy

msmanning2 Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 3:04am
post #11 of 24

Thanks again! I will post a picture after I am done tomorrow.

aliciababcock Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 3:12am
post #12 of 24

I have done a couple and I just pour into the center and let it flow outward. I pour some and add a small amount at a time until I get the desired effect. I have done it on a cold cake and a room temp cake, and the room temp worked better for me. Good luck and have fun!

katy625 Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 4:35am
post #13 of 24

I don't know if you need a recipe or not but i use this one to cover my 9 inch cakes in my photos

8oz semisweet chocolate (ghiradelli)
1/2 cup heavy whippingcream

heat in double boiler until melted then immediately pour over cake! SUPER SUPER SUPER EASY!!!! I also use this with Betty Crockers Triple fudge cake! YUM! I am making yet another one this week for my dads b-day. I think Im going to pipe white chocolate around it then paint the white with Gold Luster Dust.

indydebi Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 4:43am
post #14 of 24

After I pour mine over the top, I use a spatula to push some off of the sides.....more for a complete covering, and less for the drip effect.

One thing I did find out on my last one..... be sure when you are beating or whisking the chocolate into the hot whipping cream, that the chocolate is completely melted. I had 3 little tiny pieces of unmelted chocolate (no bigger than a pinhead!) in the batch. They slid down the sides of the cake, making it look like a run in a stocking! icon_cry.gif So no pieces of chocolate unmelted, no matter how small!

Fortunately, it wasn't for a customer .... just for a home-dinner for some friends I was wanting to impress! dunce.gif

msmanning2 Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 1:21pm
post #15 of 24

I am getting so much good advice! It is going to be a square cake. Anything I need to do different for that?

katy625 Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 4:11pm
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmanning2

I am getting so much good advice! It is going to be a square cake. Anything I need to do different for that?




Nope! That is the great thing about ganache! You don't have to worry about the corners!

ShirleyW Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 5:27pm
post #17 of 24

I have a piece of advise or a tip from the chocolate class taught by Jacques Torres. After pouring your ganache or the Sarah Bernhardt and it has set, if you see any drips or run marks in it take a hair blow dryer set on hot, hold it about 8" away from the cake and move it in quick back and forth motions over the run or drip mark, only do this for a few seconds until the glaze begins to get shiny and you can see the run mark begin to smooth out. Then move on to another area of the cake if there are anymore runs marks.

msmanning2 Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 6:06pm
post #18 of 24

AWESOME~

SweetResults Posted 9 Feb 2007 , 9:46pm
post #19 of 24

Does it dry firm enough to cover with fondant?

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2007 , 1:26am
post #20 of 24

Hey, that blow dryer trick sounds cool!

Peridot Posted 16 May 2009 , 1:43am
post #21 of 24

Great advise.

Leigh01 Posted 18 May 2009 , 10:09am
post #22 of 24

The blow dryer trick works like a dream icon_biggrin.gif

Evoir Posted 18 May 2009 , 12:58pm
post #23 of 24

I was taught to wiggle the pour in an "X" fashion to each corner of a square cake to get coverage of the corners with ganache.

SweetSuzie Posted 19 May 2009 , 6:38pm
post #24 of 24

I used a ganache on top of a cake before and it came out great. The only thing was it didn't get hard. So my question is how do you dip strawberries in there. They won't ever set like plain melted chocolate like I use now. Also. Because I only wanted chocolate on the top I had to be sure not to pour too much for it do go down the sides. I put a thick rope border at the top of the cake to help ensure a dam. Any guidance on bettering my process?
LL

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